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Author Topic: Manuscript Writers Support Thread  (Read 559670 times)
llanfair
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« Reply #2490 on: March 01, 2012, 12:47:54 PM »

Just received news today that a co-authored manuscript was accepted, with minor revisions.

Wow, congrats merinoblue!  You must celebrate!

Congratulations! That's great.
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merinoblue
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« Reply #2491 on: March 01, 2012, 1:45:43 PM »

Thank you both so much.  It's my first systematic review, and it was nearly two years in the making, so it is nice to see it accepted.  Gradually, I'm learning how you do these things.
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bevo98
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« Reply #2492 on: March 01, 2012, 2:30:54 PM »

Thank you both so much.  It's my first systematic review, and it was nearly two years in the making, so it is nice to see it accepted.  Gradually, I'm learning how you do these things.

That's the way we all do! 
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loar1923
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« Reply #2493 on: March 11, 2012, 8:16:15 AM »

So something happened in the last few months.  I don't know what it was, but I like it.

I'm a Ph.D. candidate, not faculty, and have been lagging behind on the whole issue of manuscript submission.  But, I've been plenty busy with conference papers, and have written and presented quite a few over the last three or so years.

Finally, I decided to get off my butt and do something with them.  In the last month, I've revised two former conference papers for submission, one as a single author from a conference I presented at a couple years ago, and one I presented at last year.  The second one I did because I didn't want to get scooped on the research I did, the first because... well, just because.

Anyway, one's been submitted and the other will be in the next couple weeks.

These will hopefully be my first major articles, although I'll have a book chapter from a paper at conference I'm presenting at this spring, and a 4-author paper (I'm 3rd) sometime this summer.

How do you guys keep up with all these and keep productivity up?  I'm worried I'm going to burn out suddenly, even though I've got enough material right now for at least two or three more papers.  And really, I've not even gotten any reviews yet.

How long does it take to get your first article?  How many rejections did you get the first time around?
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bevo98
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« Reply #2494 on: March 11, 2012, 8:28:22 AM »

Hello loar1923 and congrats on moving forward.  Sounds as if you are hitting your stride, which is good but, your concerns are legitimate.  Let me give you my take on your questions.

1.  research and writing seems to come in waves for me, there are times when I am less motivated than others, but, overall, it seems to even out.  I try to work at least one half hour everyday on my research 5-6 days a week when I am teaching and so on.  If that fails, which it has, I set aside my Saturdays for work.  It is imperative that once you are up to speed you don't stop.  Writing is a habit,  and like any other habit, you have to keep doing it in order to get better.  That being said, and especially since you are on a future professor, take a look at Robert Boices's "Advice for New Faculty."  It's a great help not only with keeping productive but with teaching.  I highly recommend it.

2.  There really is no set time frame for article submission to completion.  I have had articles accepted with minor changes and published all within a 6 month time period.  Then, I have had others, once in particular, accepted at a highly acclaimed journal, got the "yes" letter, made the changes, and it was two years later before it finally got published.  Goodness!  In my field, there is usually only one or two rounds of revisions, personally I have never had more than one round, but others have more. 

3.  Rejection happens to everyone.  It could be a matter of just not fitting with the journal, or reviewers who just see things differently.  If the rejection comes with comments that seem pertinent, use them and submit somewhere else.  There is a lot of rejection in academia, and not just with articles, steel yourself. 

Good Luck and hang in there.  Patience, it turns out, is the one skill you will need most now and in the future!
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How you expect to run with the wolves come night when you spend all day sportin' with puppies?  Omar Little
kifah4887
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« Reply #2495 on: March 18, 2012, 11:53:29 AM »

I have a question I've been unsuccessful in finding a thread for. Apologies if this is a repeat!

I submitted an article on ScholarOne. A few days later I received a message that the article "has been successfully submitted online and will be considered for peer review by the Editor of The Journal of Bright Ideas ... editorial decisions are currently taking up to 5-6 months."

My question: Does this mean that the article has gone to peer review and I'll receive word in 5-6 months, or does it mean that I'll receive word then that it got past the editor's initial weeding-out and might then go to peer review?
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monita
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« Reply #2496 on: March 18, 2012, 1:39:25 PM »

I have a question I've been unsuccessful in finding a thread for. Apologies if this is a repeat!

I submitted an article on ScholarOne. A few days later I received a message that the article "has been successfully submitted online and will be considered for peer review by the Editor of The Journal of Bright Ideas ... editorial decisions are currently taking up to 5-6 months."

My question: Does this mean that the article has gone to peer review and I'll receive word in 5-6 months, or does it mean that I'll receive word then that it got past the editor's initial weeding-out and might then go to peer review?

(Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure....)

This means that you should hear back in 5-6 months, inclusive of the time for peer review, and time for the editor to consider the reviewers' comments and make his/her own.  A lot of those online systems keep you posted, too.  You can see your manuscript's status change from something like 'with editor' to 'out for review'.

Good luck!
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kifah4887
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« Reply #2497 on: March 18, 2012, 5:30:03 PM »

Thanks monita! It makes me happy then, that it's at least considered worthy of review. Just a step above outright rejection but better than worst case scenario.
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youllneverwalkalone
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« Reply #2498 on: April 02, 2012, 7:30:32 AM »

Hi kifah,

can I ask in which field are you in? 5-6 months just to hear seem like an enormous time for most experiment-based fields...
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kifah4887
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« Reply #2499 on: April 08, 2012, 12:02:07 PM »

Hi kifah,

can I ask in which field are you in? 5-6 months just to hear seem like an enormous time for most experiment-based fields...

Hi youllneverwalkalone! The field is (non-experiment-based) social science.
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youllneverwalkalone
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« Reply #2500 on: April 10, 2012, 1:52:21 PM »

Hi kifah,

can I ask in which field are you in? 5-6 months just to hear seem like an enormous time for most experiment-based fields...

Hi youllneverwalkalone! The field is (non-experiment-based) social science.

Ok. I don't really know what are the conventions in your field, but in mine (a branch of experimental psychology) 1.5 - 2 months is generally what it takes to get the first response, at least in the 2 or 3 main journals. Of course there are exceptions (a particularly complex MS, a reviewer that needs more prodding than normal, etc), but an expected waiting time of 5-6 months would sound unprofessional (and very off-putting) in my field, if nothing because you risk that your work becomes outdated by the time it gets published (!).

However, my impression from talking to colleagues and reading internet forums is that in social science waiting time is much longer than elsewhere.
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conjugate
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« Reply #2501 on: April 19, 2012, 6:55:43 PM »

So, quite a while back I completed (my half of) a manuscript of a book.  Now I'm teaching from it.  I swear, I had no idea how many typos could avoid my steady gaze.  I am beginning to wonder what I was doing when I thought I was proofreading.  Seriously, it's painful.
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crumpet
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« Reply #2502 on: April 23, 2012, 8:34:24 AM »

Checking in after a month away doing research:

1) R&R accepted at a top journal.
2) One MS still under review.
3) Lots of book reviews and articles to write over the next few months.

How's everyone else doing?
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loar1923
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« Reply #2503 on: April 26, 2012, 8:34:22 AM »

1.  research and writing seems to come in waves for me, there are times when I am less motivated than others, but, overall, it seems to even out.  I try to work at least one half hour everyday on my research 5-6 days a week when I am teaching and so on.  If that fails, which it has, I set aside my Saturdays for work.  It is imperative that once you are up to speed you don't stop.  Writing is a habit,  and like any other habit, you have to keep doing it in order to get better.  That being said, and especially since you are on a future professor, take a look at Robert Boices's "Advice for New Faculty."  It's a great help not only with keeping productive but with teaching.  I highly recommend it.

I'll check this out.  I haven't looked at a lot of this type of book, but maybe it will help a little.  Things have been a little slower since I made the initial post, and I need to get moving again.  Research in waves, indeed!
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bookwriter
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« Reply #2504 on: May 06, 2012, 7:23:51 PM »

hello, this is a great thread for me at the stage of struggling with a ms.

writing used to be really fun: now it is still fun except that I have a tight self-made deadline to meet. It has been extended so many times that the best and only option for me is to submit the ms by the end of this month. And when I count down the days, there are just about three weeks left.

In the past I used to worry about not having enough external opportunity for publication, now it turns out that the biggest challenge is still oneself, to be able to make to the deadlines and to fulfill the projected expectations.

This occurs to me as I work with a massive ms: there is always something I can do: cutting down unnecessary part, enhance the conclusion, correct errors in formatting and bibliography, copyediting, reshaping the subtitles for chapters, revising the titles, or maybe just polishing the language. I thought of the previous challenges and failures that I suffer, most of which is resulted from vague goals and unnecessary worries. The other day I was watching an interview with Judy Dench, one of my favorite actresses, who says that one of the most important suggestions she received about acting is, "Do not try to deliver every aspect of a role in a scene; focus on presenting one part of the character in a scene, and then another aspect of the character in another scene. By the end of the play, you will have performed multiple facets of that character successfully." This is really a great philosophy for writing as well.

In any ways, this must have been a shared concern among many scholars. In fact as I am writing this I just find a really good subtopic to focus and develop for the rest of today. so onward---will catch up a few days later on updates.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 7:25:27 PM by publish2012 » Logged
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