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Judge Tosses Ex-Fraternity Members’ Defamation Suit Against ‘Rolling Stone’

A federal judge on Tuesday dismissed a defamation lawsuit against Rolling Stone magazine that had been brought by three former members of a fraternity at the University of Virginia, the Associated Press reported. The plaintiffs had sued the magazine over a 2014 article, since debunked, that described a gang rape at the campus’s Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house.

The accusation rocked the campus, but the police in Charlottesville, Va., said their investigation had found no evidence to corroborate th…

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Hillary Clinton Proposes Student-Loan Deferments for Entrepreneurs

Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, on Tuesday proposed allowing entrepreneurs to defer making federal student-loan payments as a way to encourage them to create more jobs, the Associated Press reported.

Mrs. Clinton told an audience at a rally in Colorado that, under her proposal, entrepreneurs and their early employees would be able to defer payments on their loans for up to three years.

Also under the plan, graduates whose businesses provide social benefits could…

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ACT Will Change Scoring Scale for Writing Test

The ACT plans to change the score range for the optional writing test on its college-entrance examination, the organization announced on Tuesday. Starting this fall, the writing test will be scored on a 2-to-12 scale. The writing test itself will not change, according to a news release.

Last year the ACT revised the writing test, and students began receiving results on the same 1-to-36 scale used on the multiple-choice exam. But the change caused confusion, ACT officials say. “Converting the …

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Private Urban Universities Beat Rivals in Enrollment and Revenue Growth, Moody’s Says

Private urban universities are outperforming their rural and suburban counterparts in enrollment and revenue growth, according to a new report from Moody’s Investors Service.

Private urban universities can use their locations to their advantages and attract more international students, graduate students, and students in continuing-education programs, according to the credit-rating agency’s report.

Enrollment at private urban universities rated by Moody’s grew 34 percent from 2000 to 2015, compar…

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For-Profit Coalition Seeks to Bolster the Flipped-Classroom Approach

A new company is seeking to tap what it sees as a rich vein of research and a lucrative global market for an approach to teaching and learning called flipped learning.

A flipped classroom describes a wide range of educational methods, like just-in-time teaching, peer instruction, and the use of clickers. Advocates of the approach tend to share the conviction that students should engage actively with course material during class instead of listening to a lecture.

In other countries, flipped learn…

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U. of Chicago Faculty and Students Protest Layoffs of Departmental Aides

It’s not just underfunded public institutions like Chicago State University that are feeling the pain of budget cuts in Illinois; even the wealthy and private University of Chicago is being roiled by spending cuts and layoffs that have fallen heavily on nonacademic and secretarial staffers, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Several employees in the humanities division were let go in mid-May, and another round of cuts affecting other branches could hit at the end of June, faculty and union representat…

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U. of S.C. President Says Fraternities May Be Able to Avoid Ban on Pledging

Fraternities and sororities at the University of South Carolina at Columbia may be able to avoid a proposed ban on the pledging process if they clean up their acts, the university’s president says.

The proposed policy, which university officials first put forward in May, would abolish the formal pledging period and replace it with several new processes, including a university-run education, training, and assessment program for students interested in joining Greek-letter organizations. “We thin…

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Monmouth U. Will Keep Woodrow Wilson’s Name on Campus Building

Monmouth University has decided to keep Woodrow Wilson’s name on a campus building that honors him, following discussions on the New Jersey campus of his segregationist views, the Asbury Park Press reported.

The university said in a written statement that its board had required that “significant steps” be taken to foster a “comprehensive and balanced understanding” of the former president’s legacy.

“Moving forward,” the university said, “the board charged the administration with sharing a more c…

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67 Colleges Will Take Part in Education Dept.’s Pell-for-Prisoners Program

Sixty-seven institutions of higher education will participate in the U.S. Education Department’s pilot program to make Pell Grants available to prison inmates, the department announced on Friday.

The department announced the program in July of last year. Its rollout comes more than 20 years after Congress prohibited inmates from receiving Pell Grants.

“The evidence is clear,” said the U.S. education secretary, John B. King Jr., in a news release. “Promoting the education and job training for inc…

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Grambling State President Resigns After Less Than a Year in Office

The president of Grambling State University, Willie D. Larkin, resigned on Thursday barely a year after he assumed the leadership of the historically black university in Louisiana, The Advocate reported.

Mr. Larkin, who is the university’s ninth president, announced his plan to step down at the University of Louisiana’s Board of Supervisors meeting in Ruston, La., after he and other presidents in the system received their annual personal evaluations.

The system’s spokeswoman, Cami Geisman, decl…