Tag Archives: work-life balance

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Expecting Balance

[This is a repost of a ProfHacker oldie, originally from 27 May 2011.]

A perennial sore point in academe is the phenomenon of work-life balance. As Amy noted last year, there’s always something you could be doing. What’s more, there’s a good chance you like at least some part of the work, since it’s what drew you into the profession, and so you gladly take on more and more, until you realize that you’ve forgotten that you have a third child or sick parent, or your partner starts taking out pers…

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Working Hours for Graduate Students

Horsehead NebulaOne thing any academic recognizes is the fact that there is always more work to be done. There’s always another article to read, another experiment to run, another set of data to code, or another archive to consult. And so this leads, reasonably enough, to some anxiety about just how much work one should be doing at any given moment.

Graduate students, especially newer ones, understandably need guidance in learning to recognize the norms and values of the academy. And so, a few weeks ago, an unn…

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How do You Hack Families and Academic Travel?

picture of a airplane

A few weeks ago, I wrote to announce the Digital Humanities Winter Institute. While I wanted to make sure as many people know about this training opportunity as possible, I was also personally interested. I’m lucky enough to have some professional development funds for next year, and I thought that this could be a great opportunity to put those funds to use while learning R.

All of that changed, however, when I looked pulled up the DHWI dates on my calendar. Running from 7-11 January, the Insti…

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When Enough Is (Good) Enough: A Review of ‘Professor Mommy’

Professor Mommy cover[This is a guest post by Aimee L. Pozorski, an associate professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. The president of the Philip Roth Society, her book on Roth and Trauma is just out with Continuum. Her prior ProfHacker posts focus on working with student veterans, responding to criticism and on creativity and academic research. Weirdly, she's not online at all.--@jbj]

I first returned to teaching in August of 2003, three months after my son was born. Distracted about leaving a…

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Expecting Balance

Honey Badger

A perennial sore point in academe is the phenomenon of work-life balance. As Amy noted last year, there’s always *something* you could be doing. What’s more, there’s a good chance you *like* at least some part of the work, since it’s what drew you into the profession, and so you gladly take on more and more, until you realize that you’ve forgotten that you have a third child or sick parent, or your partner starts taking out personal ads in the campus paper, or your dog mauls you as a stranger w…