Tag Archives: wordpress

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New WordPress Plugin for Hypothes.is

Back in January, Maha wrote about her use of Hypothes.is, a collaborative web annotation tool that works within your web browser. As Maha explains, this tool gives readers who are all assigned the same readings a choice: they can “do these readings in isolation, or they can read them in asynchronous collaboration with others who had read and annotated them beforehand; they can learn from what others have been saying about those reading.” Hypothes.is has a great many potential uses for education…

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Through Another’s Eyes: Troubleshooting with User Switching

Two different views of the same objectLast week, I introduced readers to Installatron, a tool that’s very useful for backing up and cloning WordPress installations. This week’s post continues the WordPress thread.

Many of us who use WordPress use it for maintaining a personal website and/or a professional portfolio; we’re the only users registered on our sites.

Others, however, use WordPress for course sites to which they invite students to contribute, or maintain a Multisite installation. They may have a lot of users. Adminsistrato…

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Backup and Development with Installatron

A screenshot of cPanel

It’s no secret that we love WordPress here at ProfHacker. It powers this blog, and many of us use it for our own personal, professional, and/or course sites.

As with anything else digital, it’s important to back up your WordPress installation, and to check those backups regularly.

We’ve also noted that, when making significant changes to your site, it’s good practice to work in a development environment, rather than on a live site. So we’ve also covered how to set up a development environment o…

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Accessing Your WordPress Database with Adminer

View of phpMyAdminIn last week’s post, I wrote about a useful plugin for backing up your WordPress site. Backups are vitally important, especially for those of us who use our sites for professional purposes (for some of us, that includes our courses).

This week, I’d like to make a brief note about another helpful WordPress plugin. Sometimes, particularly if you’re running a WordPress network, you might need to access data about your users (e.g. email address, username, registration date, etc.) That information re…

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Protecting Your Site with BackWPup

Old floppy disks used for backupRules of computing:

  1. If it’s important, back it up.

  2. Refer to Rule #3.

  3. See Rule #1.

Those are serious rules. Really. There’s nothing more horrifying than losing the only copy of something you’ve spent hours/days/weeks/months on.

The rules apply to websites as well as other information, and we’ve written a lot in this space about ways to back up a site. Julie introduced readers to a few methods of website backup, Kathleen wrote more specifically about backing up a WordPress site, and Mark r…

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Making a WordPress Site Multilingual

A parade of flags from many different countries.WordPress is a favorite tool of many of us here at ProfHacker. It’s great for running a course website, maintaining a professional portfolio, running a blog (ProfHacker runs on WordPress), or managing almost any other sort of website, really.

Every once in a while, there’s a need to present a site’s material in more than one language. If the material in question is really short, the solution is simple enough: just make the page or post a bit longer by including the additional languages right the…

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Open Thread Wednesday: What are Your Summer Plans?

Young woman on a ropes courseWith finals  and commencement just around the corner — or already finished — our thoughts turn toward summer. Some of us will be teaching summer classes; others may be planning travel. Most of us are likely to be working on projects of various sorts, and preparing classes for the fall term.

I’ll be doing some travel, including spending a good part of June in Minnesota for the Collegium Colloquy on Faith and Intellectual Life.

I also have one major project: learning WordPress more thoroughly. I’v…

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Access Monitor: WordPress Plugin to Monitor Accessibility

Here at ProfHacker, we’ve written several posts over the years about accessibility, about WordPress, and about WordPress and accessibility. (As many of you already know, there are significant differences between sites run on WordPress.com and those run with WordPress.org software. Among those differences are the availability of certain themes and plugins. You can read more about the differences on this support page.)

For a variety of reasons, it’s important to make digital resources usable by…

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‘Accessibility Ready’ WordPress Themes

Long a fan of the content-management-system software WordPress, I’m encouraged and impressed by the developers who are working to make WordPress as accessible as possible to a wide variety of users (including people with disabilities). Last month, I explained the basics of Joe Dolson’s WordPress Accessibility plugin.

Today, I’d like to draw your attention to the WordPress themes that have now passed the “Theme Accessibility Audit” guidelines (still in draft form) from the WordPress Accessibilit…

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Make Your WordPress Site More Accessible

Like many blogs, ProfHacker runs on software called WordPress, and we’ve written many posts over the years about this software. WordPress is a great tool for creating a variety of different kinds of digital resources. An important issue to consider when creating a digital resource is how accessible it is to a diversity of users — including, but not limited to, people with disabilities. (For a consideration of the various reasons why, read “Why: The Case for Web Accessibility.”) However, if you’…