Tag Archives: Twitter

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Open Thread Wednesday: Twitter Tools for Summer


It’s no secret that many of us at ProfHacker are big fans of Twitter, using it for everything from conferences to classes to bot-making to, yes, posting pictures of our cats. Several ProfHackers have shared their favorite tools and hacks for working with Twitter: Natalie gathered several of them in her recent retrospective post. This last weekend served as another reminder that Twitter can be a powerful place to experience a simultaneous happening, as the fallout from Friday’s shooting at the U…

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A Good Time to Check Your Social Media Privacy Settings


Over at the New York Times “Bits” blog, Nick Bilton reminds us that we should review “who has access to [our] social accounts” from time to time. Services like Twitter, Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn often invite us to link certain services to our accounts, for reasons that vary from making it easier to update multiple accounts at once to being able to authenticate our identity for a third-party service. It’s all too easy to forget just how many of those third-party services have been granted a…

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Keeping Your Offsite Twitter Archive Fresh: A Fix

A year ago I wrote about Martin Hawksey‘s awesome hack that keeps your offsite Twitter archive fresh. This tool takes your Twitter archive (a complete set of your tweets, which you can request from your Twitter settings) and then daily adds your latest tweets using a Google Apps script. The archive resides in Google Drive as a regular web page. For example, here’s my archive.

Unfortunately, sometime in December 2013, Google changed something with its scripting language, and this broke many insta…

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From the Archives: Using Twitter

robinThe essential ProfHacker introduction to Twitter is Ryan’s appropriately titled post, How to Start Tweeting (and Why You Might Want To). He covers all the basics, including creating your profile, using lists, and following hashtags. But we’ve written quite a few other posts about this popular social media platform:

Making the Most of Twitter

Erin’s primer on Choosing #Hashtags explains how to make the most of this feature of Twitter.

I wrote about Using Twitter Lists to streamline your reading e…

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Livetweeting Classes: Some Suggested Guidelines

livetweeting1At ProfHacker, we’ve written a lot about using Twitter in the classroom. Mark has written a framework for teaching with Twitter; Ryan about disposable Twitter accounts for classroom use; Erin on choosing hashtags. I’ve used Twitter in the classroom for some pretty successful assignments; particularly in the case of live tweeting films (see one of my previous assignments here). Unlike the typical passive viewing sessions, live tweeting allows instructors to directly engage in the student’s lear…

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Preserve Peace of Mind on Twitter by Disabling Retweets

retweets
Imagine, if you will, a family member or close friend. You care about this person, and value them for their perspective on the world. Except, as it happens, on that *one* subject. Maybe their political views are lifted wholesale from Fox or MSNBC. Maybe they parrot talk radio’s outrage of the day about sports or celebrity culture. Or during Premier League games they shout at the TV as if they were at a pub. Or perhaps this person loves to get your goat by telling you what other folks are saying…

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Ten Tips for Tweeting at Conferences

A nest-shaped bowl with buttons with Twitter logos, a hash and @ signIt’s no surprise that we here at ProfHacker like Twitter. We’ve covered how to start tweeting (and why you might want to) and practical advice for teaching with Twitter. I’ve found Twitter to be a tremendous boon to developing my professional networks and helping me stay on top of what’s happening in my fields of scholarship. But there’s one place where where Twitter perhaps ends up being more valuable for me than other place: at conferences.

Tweeting at conferences is a great way to share what …

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From the Archives: Academic Conferences

name badgesConferences are an important part of many people’s academic careers: they provide the opportunity to present your research to specialists in your field; to talk with friends and colleagues at other institutions; and to learn about new publications, methods, and current research. They can also cause anxiety or disappointment (especially those conferences that include job interviews). But being prepared for your next conference, whether it’s your first or your fiftieth, with some tips from the Pro…

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Weekend Reading: Nobel Laureate Edition

5087836026_089003fb38_m This week saw the announcement of several of the 2013 Nobel Laureates: François Englert and Peter W. Higgs for Physics; Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel for Chemistry; James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman and Thomas C. Südhof for medicine, and Alice Munro for literature. Munro’s win is particularly significant: she is the first Canadian author to win the prize. Here is The New York Times on Munro’s award. Also, over at Salon, Daniel D’Addario has given us “8 things to know about …