Tag Archives: collaboration

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Are We Solving the Right Problems?

Last week, our technology program brought in a trainer on Agile development methods, which is really an alternative approach to project management that’s particularly brought to bear on large software productions. One compelling aspect of the agile approach is the attempt to reconcile what every member of a team brings to a vision–including the difference between what a customer says and thinks they want, and what they really want. As we worked through strategies for continuous learning and ada…

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A Quick Recap of Day of DH 2014

Book and laptop

This post was originally scheduled to run last week, but then there was Heartbleed.

So it’s only now that we get to look back to this year’s Day of Digital Humanities event, held on April 8 and hosted for the second year in a row by the wonderful team at Matrix, including Ethan Wattrall. For those who may be unfamiliar with the event, it’s a day in which those working in digital humanities publicly document some of their work day and discuss their work.

What is digital humanities? For answers t…

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Software and Services for Managing Group Tasks


The world of software and online services is a densely populated field of companies who want you to share your to-do list with them. We’ve reviewed some of them here, including Todoist, Gqueues, Wunderlist, Basecamp, and Got Milk?. New options are appearing all the time, but I’ve long been a fan of Omnifocus and have good friends who swear by Things, both of which grow out of the Mac/iOS ecosystem.

However, task management software and services for individuals are increasingly clashing with an …

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Crowd-Sourcing Examinations

[Note: this post is adapted from part of a talk I recently gave to the NJEDge Annual Faculty Showcase.]

It’s no secret that we at ProfHacker like GoogleDocs. Ryan Cordell has used Google Docs to run a peer-review writing workshop, and George Williams has previously written about using GoogleDocs to take collaborative notes at conference sessions. Guest poster Thomas Burkholder wrote about using Google Forms. I have used all of these, and today I’m going to share yet another use: for compiling a…

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Making History Accessible: SlaveryStories.org

SlaveryStories_screenshot

Sometimes, an interesting project gets started unexpectedly. That’s what happened with SlaveryStories.org, a new, collaborative digital project that launched February 3, just as Black History Month began.

So what is SlaveryStories.org? It’s an online home for stories about slavery, told from the perspective of the slaves themselves.

The project got its start shortly after Rob Walsh, one of Scholastica’s* founders, went to see Twelve Years a Slave. He decided to read Solomon Northup’s memoir, …

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Labguru for Life Science Lab Management (and more)

DNA lab
French scientist Louis Pasteur said “chance favors the prepared mind.” In the game of scientific research, organization can be key to creating favorable conditions for the great moments every scientist hopes for. And yet, how many of us in the sciences actually thought of the labs they trained in as a model of organization? How many of us, especially faculty members at small schools who are principal investigator (PI) and lab manager all in one, could improve lab management? And how do we mode…

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One Week | One Tool: Introducing Serendip-o-matic

Serendip-o-matic logo[ProfHacker interrupts our scheduled summer break for this special, breaking news! We'll be back in the full swing of things on Monday, August 12! --Ed.]

This past week, I was one of twelve participants in “One Week | One Tool” (OWOT), an Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and hosted by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. The team first assembled on the evening of Sunday, 28 J…

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Ph.D. Placement Project

3048559779_41ca84b562_mRegular readers of the Chronicle are surely familiar with the ongoing discussion about the merits of graduate education both generally and in the humanities more specifically. Whatever your position on the “Go!Don’t Go!” debate (note: two different links), one thing is clear: more information about where Ph.D.s end up would be very helpful both to potential candidates, employers, and the professoriate more generally.

In his most recent column, William Pannapacker threw down the gauntlet, so t…

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Hacking Prezi as a Platform for Visual Composition and Design Experimentation

A Ferris Wheel at Night

[This is a guest post by Kimon Keramidas, Assistant Professor and Director for the Digital Media Lab at the Bard Graduate Center. Kimon teaches about the design and material culture of technology and is tasked with integrating and implementing digital media within the curricular and research goals of faculty and students. He also leads the development of digital media and interactives for the BGC’s Focus Gallery exhibitions. Find him online at http://kimonkeramidas.net and follow him on Twitte…

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What (and How) Do You Delegate?

We’re big on collaboration at ProfHacker. We write about it quite a bit. Many of us come out of the digital humanities, which as a field prizes collaboration as a virtue. But as we all know, however, collaboration is not universally so prized in the academy. In humanities fields, collaborative efforts are often viewed with suspicion—we’ve long operated on the “solitary genius” model, and still sometimes wonder “just what did you do?” when discussing a joint endeavor. In the sciences, of course, …