Tag Archives: apps


Making Made Easier with 123D Apps


I am lucky in that in our unit, we have our very own maker space, complete with a 3D printer, laser cutter, and a variety of Arduino chips (as well as K’nex and other physical making materials). We’re also really lucky to have our colleague Derek Eggers in charge of the space, along with working on maker pedagogy more broadly. He and I are collaborating to find ways to make making more accessible for so called non-traditional disciplines, such as the humanities.

One way we are developing is cre…


Digital and Analogue Writing with LiveScribe

I still love to write thing by hand, on paper, in a notebook. Call it a holdover from my days (and nights) spent writing in journals and diaries and notebooks. I always had a notebook and pen with me. I was always writing.

Now I have my iPhone with me, and I tweet a whole lot.

But writing out drafts, or brainstorming, or jotting down ideas, those are activities that I miss doing. What I don’t miss doing in transcribing them, or not having access to them if I don’t happen to have the right n…


Keeping Track of People with Status

It’s been almost a year since my family moved, meaning that my husband now has an hour commute to and from work. He was getting tired of me texting him asking if he had left yet or where he was on his route home. He found the app Status that automated the process of letting me know (and vice versa) where he was or what he was doing.

Available for both iPhones and Android devices, it lets anyone you allow to see where you are and what you are doing (according to status notifications that automat…


Select and Click: PopClip Makes Text Manipulation Easy on the Mac


[This is a guest post by Jim Cracraft, a Language Teaching Specialist and technology coordinator at Vanderbilt University's English Language Center (ELC), which offers English language support to individuals who have a first language other than English. He can be reached through the center's website: http://vanderbilt.edu/elc/ --@JBJ]

As a longtime Mac user who does not own an iOS device, I have been somewhat reluctant to embrace the steady “iOS-ification” of the Mac–you know, the aesthetic and…


Weekend Reading: Memorial Day Weekend Edition


Happy Memorial Day Weekend, ProfHackers! Before we launch into the Weekend Reading, we wanted to take a moment a remember those who have served our country both at home and abroad. Thank you for your service and your sacrifice.

Laura Miller, writer for Salon.com has broken up with Amazon. Citing the online everything seller’s increasingly monopolistic tactics, she points to the recent scuffle with Hachette books, reported by the New York Times, where Amazon has delayed shipment of certain Hache…


All Things Google: A Busy Month

Google logo with Einstein's face addedThere’s been a lot going on for Google lately. Since just before the end of April, Google has made changes to its mobile apps, introduced a new tool for educators, and run into some trouble in Europe. Given the degree to which All Things Google play a role in our lives (for good or for ill), it seems appropriate to offer some brief commentary on each.

Mobile applications

The change to Google’s mobile applications was a pretty significant one. Previously, everything you wanted to do with any docu…


Using iAnnotate as a Grading Tool

8167818394_244f97b2a8_bOver the years, ProfHacker has featured several posts about grading. Back in 2010, Nels asked, “Are you locked in grading jail?” and followed up his question with another post that explained “Breaking Out of Grading Jail.” Billie Hara added “On the Comforts of Grading Jail” while Jason wrote about “Grading Triage.” There’s even a helpful Archive post by Natalie on grading. But grading is one part of professorial life that will never go away, and it’s the time of year when we’re all probably up t…


How Do Your Tools Help You Move Forward?

unicorn The itch to try out a new shiny app or workflow method is perhaps something of an occupational hazard for ProfHackers and others drawn to productivity improvements and lifehacking. After all, we try things out so that we can tell you whether they are worth your time. And some experimentation is a good thing.

But if something is working for you, then don’t feel like you have to change it. I’ve seen too many people think they ought to make their workflow completely digital, or go all-Google or no…


Tidy Up Your Mac Menu Bar with Bartender

Red restaurant menus sitting by a wine glassEver since Jason covered Skitch as a great tool for quickly annotating screenshots back in 2009 (AKA ye olde ProefHaecker), I’ve been adding additional applications that run in the menu bar of my Macs. The menu bar is the little strip at the top of your screen where your clock, wifi indicator, and other little icons live. Along with features of the Mac operating system, many little pieces of software that run in the background on my computer have an icon in the menu bar. When I need an applicat…


Action-Oriented Email for the iPhone: Boxer and Dispatch

Ajax is optimisticIn February, Ryan reviewed Mailbox, an iOS app with a fast, triage-based approach to handling email on a smartphone. Mailbox uses a nifty swipe-based approach to managing e-mail actions such as deferring, deleting/archiving, or listing e-mails, and it wasn’t hard to see that others would follow suit. And sure enough, later in the spring came Triage, pitched as “first aid for your inbox,” with a cool flick-based interface. This week, there are two new email clients for iOS–Boxer (formerly Taskbox…