Category Archives: Wellness


Slowing Down: 6 Strategies for Deep Listening

[This is a guest post by Janine Utell, who is a Professor of English at Widener University in Pennsylvania. She teaches composition and 19th and 20th century British literature; she has also facilitated a number of on- and off-campus workshops on writing, critical thinking, and general education. Previously at ProfHacker, she’s written on “Practical Wisdom and Professional Life”, “How to Study Your Own Teaching (And Why You Might Want To),” and “Visualizing Your Promotion Portfolio with Cmap….


Seeking Suggestions for a Road Trip

Here at ProfHacker, we’ve previously written about travel, but this summer involves a 13+ hour car trip to Montreal with my two kids in the back seat. Most of our posts are about air travel and conference travel. And I’m looking for some advice.

Most travel apps focus on air travel or taking the scenic route. I am doing neither. I also won’t be traveling through any large cities along my route, making hotel finding apps almost useless.  And once I cross the boarder into Canada, I can kiss my…


Susan Cain’s Quiet Revolution


In personality typologies derived from the work of Carl Jung, introverts are described as people who gain energy from solitude and extroverts as people who gain energy from being around other people. Understanding where you fall on the introvert-extrovert spectrum can help you understand your own energy patterns and how best to work with them within your professional and personal life. (As an introvert, for example, after attending several sessions at an academic conference and interacting with…


Three Things You Should Stop Doing This Summer

anxious cat

As the summer begins, many of us are busy setting writing goals, drawing up to-do lists for household projects, and scheduling a bit of travel, whether for work or play. All of those are good things to be doing right now.

But in addition to planning out what you want to do this summer, it can be really helpful to figure out what it is that you don’t want to do.

I call this the No-Do List. You could also call it the Not-To-Do List, but I like putting the word No at the forefront, since Not Doing…


Eating Better With Your Local CSA


We try to eat well in our family, but vegetables have always been a challenge. Between two picky eaters when it comes to veggies (my husband and my son), we tend to get stuck in a rut, buying the same veggies prepared in the same ways over and over and over again. We start eating less and less of them per meal, and then, suddenly, we barely eating any at all.

Couple that with the first-year anniversary of my much more seated office job and, well, we’ve made a commitment to start eating health…


Being a Caregiver with an Academic Career


[Tim Lepczyk is the Director of Faculty Instructional Technology at Hendrix College. You can follow him on Twitter at @thirdcoast.--@JBJ]

There is research to perform. Lectures to prepare. Exams to grade. Articles to write and meetings to attend. The life of a professor is like the pulse of an airport: arrivals, departures, a steady stream of events all lining up against a timetable. It’s a hard balance between commitments and managing one’s time. However, when a longterm care situation combine…


Ten Things to Do Instead of Checking Email

steaming pot

So, let’s imagine that you’re in your office, and have about 15 minutes before you need to walk out of your building to get to a meeting. What do you do in those 15 minutes?

Many readers probably answered “check email.” Checking email has become the default work-ish activity for many professionals. I said work-ish because while checking email may be work-related, for most people it is not a central activity of their work.

In fact, checking email can easily become a kind of distraction, keeping …


Get Started Exercising on a Tight Schedule with the 7-Minute Workout

8084682666_5244eb9f50_bWe write about fitness quite a bit here at ProfHacker. I must confess, though, that until quite recently I was all excuses. Beginning in grad school and through my first post-grad-school job, I was far, far “too busy” to work out. I had excuses every day—writing, teaching, grading, and family—all good priorities, to be sure, but none that truly took over my life so as to make exercise literally impossible. I fell out of the habit, and over a decade lost any will to do it. But my reticence ha…


Analog Distractions: Cooperative Board Games Forbidden Island and Forbidden Desert

If you’ve ever read one of our ProfHacker holiday gift guides, you’ll know that lots of us are big fans of board games, and in particular of the new breed of smart board games that have appeared in increasing numbers in the past decade or so. Board games are oddly hip, and for good reason—there’s more variety and complexity in the genre than ever before.

Board games are a big part of my family life; my wife, kids, and I love to play in the evenings and especially on the weekends. We’re always lo…


Finding the Best Thing with Wirecutter and Sweethome

Blue ribbon prize.

If you’re like me, when shopping for…well for almost anything…you can be paralyzed by choice. If you need a new set of headphones, there are just so many options out there, and so many blogs or forums in which experts and consumers will discuss in detail the pros and cons of any given choice. We do a bit of that here at ProfHacker, of course, and we hope our recommendations are good ones.

But choosing can still be exhausting. Barry Schwartz calls this problem The Paradox of Choice in his book o…