Category Archives: Uncategorized

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Weekend Reading: Strawberry Moon Edition

5378236359_16af4407ca_zAs the summer heats up in many parts of the world, we here at ProfHacker hope that you are keeping cool whether by visiting the pool with the family, hitting the stacks in the library (bonus points if you’re in a temperature-controlled archive!), getting some writing done in your favorite air-conditioned coffee shop or writing place, or even catching a movie. But if the sky is clear where you happen to be tonight, you might want to go outside and catch a glimpse at the full moon, called both the…

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Crowd-Sourcing Examinations

[Note: this post is adapted from part of a talk I recently gave to the NJEDge Annual Faculty Showcase.]

It’s no secret that we at ProfHacker like GoogleDocs. Ryan Cordell has used Google Docs to run a peer-review writing workshop, and George Williams has previously written about using GoogleDocs to take collaborative notes at conference sessions. Guest poster Thomas Burkholder wrote about using Google Forms. I have used all of these, and today I’m going to share yet another use: for compiling a…

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Weekend Reading: Is it Spring Yet? Edition

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Happy Friday ProfHackers!

Perhaps the biggest news of the week: The Getty Museum has opened up it’s digital content. Here’s the original announcement. Digital Trends reports on the announcement as well.

Also unveiled this week is a new project by our friends at the Roy Rosenweig Center for New Media: History of the National Mall. Here is the announcement and project description.

Earlier this week, the college board announced that in 2016 the SAT will get, in the words of a Miami Herald reporter…

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Weekend Reading: Opening Ceremonies edition

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The 2014 Winter Olympics began this week. The Washington Post details the difficulties facing NBC and its affiliates in covering the events. The opening ceremony takes place Friday at 11:00AM (several hours before this post goes live), but it won’t be aired to American audiences until Friday night. Earlier this week, animal rights activists mobilized in an attempt to save stray dogs, as reported by CNN. Slate covers the rainbow Google doodle, “Google Joins Criticism of Sochi Olympics with Rainb…

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Weekend Reading: Unseasonably Cold Edition

  Suddenly, November is halfway over and the end of the semester is looming. In my state, South Carolina, we have had unseasonably cold weather. I know that lows in the upper-20s or low-30s are routine for many of our readers, but it’s very unusual around these parts.

In “Down with Service, Up with Leadership,” Cathy N. Davidson argues that institutions need to reframe service in favor of institutional leadership: “If from the beginning we made the three pillars of our academic-reward system scho…

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Weekend Reading: The Global Digital Culture Edition

Photo of planet earth, as seen from space.In this Weekend Reading, I feature some projects and opportunities involving global digital culture. Links feature an educational version of SimCity to teach about pollution and climate change; a piece on how electronic reading affects comprehension; a conference on the culture of free software; an opportunity to digitally transcribe Smithsonian documents; and a call to support the innovative efforts by a Netherlands NGO to put an end to webcam child sex tourism. The video below is from the grou…

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YouTube Trickery

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Who among us hasn’t occasionally embedded a YouTube video into a blog, LMS, or other resource? And while YouTube’s “related videos” feature is an outstanding way to find even more videos of cute boxer dogs, occasionally Google’s sense of “related” can lead you to some awkward places. For example, perhaps you’re kicking off class discussion with a short film clip, or an interview, or even Ricky Gervais discussing the finer points of literary theory, and at the end of the clip YouTube offers some…

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Weekend Reading: Harvest Moon Edition

1445109251_10e87ddbd8_m Happy weekend, everyone! This week saw a Harvest Moon, September 18-19 and 19-20. The Harvest Moon is the name for the full moon which appears a few days before the autumnal equinox (September 22 in 2013). It is unique not only because of its proximity to the equinox, but because the harvest moon rises a bit earlier than the typical full moon–in a nutshell, we get to enjoy it for about 30 minutes longer than usual. For more detailed information about the Harvest Moon, check out this article fro…

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No Time To Shop for Clothes? Try Stitch Fix!

Screenshot_8_29_13_12_39_PMDuring the academic year I get so busy that a lot of things start falling by the wayside: shopping, doctors’ appointments, house chores… the list goes on. Last month I just discovered a great solution to the first thing that goes out of the window: updating my wardrobe. The answer: Stitch Fix, a personal stylist in a box.

Stitch Fix is a very interesting example of the ways algorithms are combined with human oversight to create a personalized consumer experience. When you sign up for Stitch Fix,…

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Weekend Reading: No Answers Edition

fireworksWe might as well go into the long weekend with a bit of comedy, and so I’ll point here to the Coursera professor email that Aaron Bady released on Twitter last night. Jonathan Rees has worked out the exact right take here: The problem isn’t anything the professor said, it’s that the e-mail concedes that the xMOOC business model depends on freezing these courses in time: develop once, then regurgitate it over and over again.

That’s not exactly surprising news, but it’s useful to see an ostensibl…