Category Archives: Uncategorized

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Weekend Reading: Winter’s Come Early Edition

5431511948_42ebae7119_z Happy Friday, ProfHackers! We hope that where ever you are, you are staying warm as much of the United States is grappling with unseasonable cold and snow.

For your weekend reading, you might be interested in the resolution that Hachette and Amazon reached this week. The conflict began in January. Author Douglas Preston provides another perspective on the resolution in Salon.

If you’ve been online at all this week, you’ve probably seen or at least read about Paper Magazine’s attempt to “break t…

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Untethering in the Classroom

Projecting to an Apple TV with mirroring
I hate being tethered to the podium computer in my classroom. Seriously. I have a strong preference for being able to move about the room, but I also frequently need to use the projector, which is connected to — you guessed it — the podium in the front of the room. There’s really no simple way around this.

In my ideal world, I’d be teaching in a classroom equipped with a wireless projector. But since I don’t anticipate having access to such a projector anytime soon, I’ve had to look for other s…

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Weekend Reading: Back in the Classroom Edition

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Today’s image is a tableau titled “Classroom with Three Figures” by Lavern Kelley, painted white pine, plywood, brass, and plastic, 1979, 1984–87. I originally had something else in mind for this space, but when I came across it in my Creative Commons searching, I couldn’t not use it.

TGIF ProfHackers! This was the first week (back?) for many of us, and we hope it went well for you. For those of you who start after Labor Day, savor these final hours of freedom.

Like many of you, my social media…

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Weekend Reading: Back to School Countdown Edition

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TGIF, ProfHackers! As the beginning of the semester looms, many of us are trying to enjoy the last moments of freedom while others are finalizing syllabi and trying to meeting writing deadlines before classes begin. Amidst all of this preparation, the world has had a very busy week, and if your social media feed is anything like mine, it has been on constant overload for several days now.

One of the biggest stories to break over the last six days comes out of Ferguson, Missouri. The St. Louis s…

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Weekend Reading: Strawberry Moon Edition

5378236359_16af4407ca_zAs the summer heats up in many parts of the world, we here at ProfHacker hope that you are keeping cool whether by visiting the pool with the family, hitting the stacks in the library (bonus points if you’re in a temperature-controlled archive!), getting some writing done in your favorite air-conditioned coffee shop or writing place, or even catching a movie. But if the sky is clear where you happen to be tonight, you might want to go outside and catch a glimpse at the full moon, called both the…

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Crowd-Sourcing Examinations

[Note: this post is adapted from part of a talk I recently gave to the NJEDge Annual Faculty Showcase.]

It’s no secret that we at ProfHacker like GoogleDocs. Ryan Cordell has used Google Docs to run a peer-review writing workshop, and George Williams has previously written about using GoogleDocs to take collaborative notes at conference sessions. Guest poster Thomas Burkholder wrote about using Google Forms. I have used all of these, and today I’m going to share yet another use: for compiling a…

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Weekend Reading: Is it Spring Yet? Edition

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Happy Friday ProfHackers!

Perhaps the biggest news of the week: The Getty Museum has opened up it’s digital content. Here’s the original announcement. Digital Trends reports on the announcement as well.

Also unveiled this week is a new project by our friends at the Roy Rosenweig Center for New Media: History of the National Mall. Here is the announcement and project description.

Earlier this week, the college board announced that in 2016 the SAT will get, in the words of a Miami Herald reporter…

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Weekend Reading: Opening Ceremonies edition

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The 2014 Winter Olympics began this week. The Washington Post details the difficulties facing NBC and its affiliates in covering the events. The opening ceremony takes place Friday at 11:00AM (several hours before this post goes live), but it won’t be aired to American audiences until Friday night. Earlier this week, animal rights activists mobilized in an attempt to save stray dogs, as reported by CNN. Slate covers the rainbow Google doodle, “Google Joins Criticism of Sochi Olympics with Rainb…

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Weekend Reading: Unseasonably Cold Edition

  Suddenly, November is halfway over and the end of the semester is looming. In my state, South Carolina, we have had unseasonably cold weather. I know that lows in the upper-20s or low-30s are routine for many of our readers, but it’s very unusual around these parts.

In “Down with Service, Up with Leadership,” Cathy N. Davidson argues that institutions need to reframe service in favor of institutional leadership: “If from the beginning we made the three pillars of our academic-reward system scho…

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Weekend Reading: The Global Digital Culture Edition

Photo of planet earth, as seen from space.In this Weekend Reading, I feature some projects and opportunities involving global digital culture. Links feature an educational version of SimCity to teach about pollution and climate change; a piece on how electronic reading affects comprehension; a conference on the culture of free software; an opportunity to digitally transcribe Smithsonian documents; and a call to support the innovative efforts by a Netherlands NGO to put an end to webcam child sex tourism. The video below is from the grou…