Category Archives: Uncategorized

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Choose Your Own Conference

When I was questing for a tenure-track job in a (mostly) traditional academic discipline, it was easy to know which conferences you should be going to: you started with your national or international professional organization’s annual conferences, moved through the regionals, and then targeted conferences around your specific niche. This is, of course, an oversimplification, but after years of implicit and explicit messaging during graduate school and beyond, knowing which conferences to go t…

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Weekend Reading: Fourth of July Edition

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Happy holiday weekend to our readers in the United States and happy regular weekend to everyone else (and a belated happy Canada day to our neighbors in the north)!

According to an article in Vanity Fair, technology isn’t all it’s cracked up to be: “How iPhones Ruined Summer Camp.”

Also, for the iTunes users among us, or should I say the former iTunes users, Apple has been unrolling Apple Music over the last several days. If you use iTunes and haven’t gotten the update, it’s coming your way soo…

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Weekend Reading: The End Is Near

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The splashy news here at the tail end of the week is edX & ASU’s announcement that they are going to offer a first year of college. Not for free, or even for “as inexpensively as many community colleges,” but since it’s pass, *then* pay, there’s still a somewhat innovative approach to the business model. Jonathan Rees has described the offering of MOOCs for credit as “weaponized” education technology,” and I’m not sure he’…

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Managing Expectations

Dog on roof, asking how we manage expectationsFinding appropriate work-life balance seems to be a never-ending quest in many lines of work, and academia is no exception. It’s all too easy to work far too late into the evening, grading, preparing classes, or (everyone’s favorite!) answering email.

This year, I’ve been reminded of just how important it is to manage both my own and other’s expectations about communications and working hours if I’m to have a hope of attaining something at least resembling balance. There are a few practices I’ve…

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Weekend Reading: Bring on the Madness Edition

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It’s Friday, ProfHackers–we’ve made it through another week. Do you have a bracket? Is it busted? Already?

I came across a post this week titled “A Parents’ Guide to All That Ed Tech in the Classroom: What to ask when your school says the iPads are coming.” Obviously intended for parents, this post is actually a helpful starting point for anyone who is considering incorporating more technology into an educational environment, whether parent, student, faculty member or administrator.

From Salo…

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Teaching with Wikipedia? The Wiki Education Foundation Wants to Help!

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I’ve written a number of ProfHacker articles on integrating Wikipedia into your classroom, such as this post on tips and tricks for teaching with Wikipedia and how to organize your own Wikipedia edit-a-thon. One of the biggest obstacles most instructors report facing, however, is simply learning how to use Wikipedia to the point where one feels comfortable enough to teach with it.

If this describes you, The Wiki Education Foundation wants to help. This separate arm of the Wikimedia foundation i…

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Weekend Reading: #thedress edition

Happy Friday ProfHackers! The above picture not The Dress, but it is A dress, and I couldn’t resist the shot. If you haven’t seen the dress, click the previous link. Or go to Facebook. Or Twitter. Or pretty much anywhere else online. And then, if you care why no one can agree on the colors, check out this piece on WiredThe Atlantic posted a piece that uses #thedress as a stepping stone to think about attention policing.

And in case you missed it, there was llama drama in AZ. The Twittersphere…

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Procrastination, Our Old Frenemy

A few years back, Natalie observed that “an expectation of procrastination seems almost built into the campus landscape,” an observation which hasn’t lost its accuracy since then. Heck, a non-trivial amount of modern internet and app culture often seems on a dialectic of enabling, and then overcoming, procrastination.

Two weeks ago, Shawn Blanc wrote a splendid essay describing procrastination as, fundamentally, an offense against personal integrity–against, that is, one’s commitments to onesel…

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Weekend Reading: Winter’s Come Early Edition

5431511948_42ebae7119_z Happy Friday, ProfHackers! We hope that where ever you are, you are staying warm as much of the United States is grappling with unseasonable cold and snow.

For your weekend reading, you might be interested in the resolution that Hachette and Amazon reached this week. The conflict began in January. Author Douglas Preston provides another perspective on the resolution in Salon.

If you’ve been online at all this week, you’ve probably seen or at least read about Paper Magazine’s attempt to “break t…

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Untethering in the Classroom

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I hate being tethered to the podium computer in my classroom. Seriously. I have a strong preference for being able to move about the room, but I also frequently need to use the projector, which is connected to — you guessed it — the podium in the front of the room. There’s really no simple way around this.

In my ideal world, I’d be teaching in a classroom equipped with a wireless projector. But since I don’t anticipate having access to such a projector anytime soon, I’ve had to look for other s…