Category Archives: Teaching


Open Review for Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

screenshot of MLA website

The MLA is publishing a collection of keywords on Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, which features curated sections on a variety of topics related to digital teaching methods. (I am on the advisory board for this collection.)

One of the interesting aspects of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities is that the keywords are available for open peer review and public comment. This is being staged in batches, both as a sanity-preserving mechanism and to make sure eac…


Beyond Textbooks and OER: reflecting on #OpenEd15

There has been no shortage of critiques of the open textbook focus at The Open Education Conference #OpenEd15 – I wasn’t at the conference but I followed the Twitter stream and participated in three virtually connecting sessions in which I met both pairs of keynote speakers. I have to say that the conference organizers’ really welcoming attitude towards the involvement of Virtually Connecting showed true commitment to expanding access and openness (thank you Clint Lalonde and David Wiley).



Wrapping Up A Large Online Course


This fall I’ve been teaching a large-scale online course for the first time. I’ve written a series of posts here about my experiences, and particularly what works and hasn’t worked as I’ve addressed both the challenges of scale and the problems inherent in teaching one of the only online courses offered as part of a traditional face-to-face degree:


When the Technology Changes on You

When we use technology extensively in our teaching (or work in general, really), how do we handle unexpected changes to that technology? Here are some thoughts and workarounds. (note: this was inspired by the recent change on Twitter from stars to hearts)

A Website Disappears

Someone recently tweeted about how a website suddenly disappeared a few hours before she was planning to use it in her class. I pointed her to the Wayback Machine (if you haven’t heard of this, it’s an internet archive – y…


The Games Art Historians Play: Online Game-based Learning in Art History and Museum Contexts


[Anne McClanan is a Professor of Art History at Portland State University. Her work in the digital space engages with both online pedagogy and several digital humanities projects, overviewed here.--JBJ]

I recently posted a query on the CAAH listserv (Consortium of Art and Architectural Historians) to research online game-based and gamified learning in art history and museums. Alongside leads on some of the projects I’ll share here, the post garnered some rather animated comments hinting that it…


Digital Writing Month: Striving for Inclusion in Open Online Learning

Digital Writing Month guest contributors - image created by Chris Friend

I’ve been working for some time on ideas of inclusion & (in)equality in open education, and of the possibility of a postcolonial MOOC (with Shyam Sharma), and gathering ideas from others on how to envision a more inclusive, diverse and equitable open online learning experience.

Putting Ideas into Practice

In a couple of days, I get the opportunity to see how some of these ideas work in practice, as I co-facilitate Digital Writing Month (#DigiWriMo), which is a “30-day adventure through the worl…


Managing Macs & PCs in Online Courses

When I was in middle school, the lab was filled with Apple computers, including very early versions of iMacs. I worked with the school’s resource teacher and helped out with hardware in the labs, and we continually argued over the merits of Mac versus Windows PC. Macs were winning out in schools due to a push on educational software and their relative ease of maintenance, while PCs offered an ease of upgrading and access to a world of software rarely ported onto Mac’s smaller market share. I na…


It’s Not Too Late: Making Mid-Course Adjustments


On many campuses right now, it’s midterm season. Students and faculty are feeling the strain of heavier workloads, colds and viruses are making the rounds, and the enthusiasm that marked the first few weeks of school seems like a distant memory, at least on certain days.

But if things aren’t going as well as you’d like in one of your courses, it’s good to remember that there’s still almost half a semester left, at least five or six weeks, maybe more depending on your institution’s calendar. Tha…


Making Games for Web and iOS with Stencyl

In this series, I’ve looked at a lot of newcomer-friendly tools for making games in the classroom or as projects with and for students, including Twine, Scratch, Construct 2, inklewriter, Inform 7, and Adventure Game Studio. While some of these tools are successfully cross-platform, many of the best tools for making graphical games are PC-only. This year, I’m teaching an online course that includes game development as part of exploring digital narrative. As students aren’t meeting in a universi…


Visualizing Your Searches with Trailblazer

I’ve been writing about my use of as a collaborative annotation tool this semester with the students in our introduction to literature class (see my ProfHacker post from this summer on my selection process). The tool so far has been a huge success and the students have been getting a lot out of the process. But one thing that has stumped me is how to help them navigate the process of actually going online and starting to find the contextual and referential materials they need to fin…