Category Archives: Teaching

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A Game A Day at HILT

paperpusher I’ve been blogging about Games in the Classroom here on ProfHacker for some time, and I’m very excited to be putting some of these lessons together in a week-long institute as part of the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching institute at the University of Maryland this summer, August 4th–8th. We’ll be taking some of the lessons learned from “game a week” to the next level with a “game a day” workshop. You can see the full breakdown and resources for the workshop here. If you’re interested…

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Why I Record my Conference Presentations

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While I was attending the ADHO Digital Humanities conference this summer, I wound up talking with several people about the shifts we’ve noticed in presentation styles within our respective disciplines. Although presenter habits vary by discipline, by field, and by conference, in my own fields of literature and digital humanities I’ve certainly noticed a shift away from the reading of written papers towards a more flexible presentation style, often accompanied by projected slides.

Back in the pr…

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From the Archives: Creating Syllabi

We’ve written quite a lot at ProfHacker about syllabus and course design. Check out 2010’s Archives post or the many posts tagged with syllabus or syllabi. This roundup of posts focuses on the basics of syllabus creation.

What Do You Need to Do?

  • In a previous Archives post on Syllabi and Course Design, I said

    Keep in mind, the first rule of productivity is “don’t fix what’s already working.” If you’re satisfied with the assignments, policies, and course plans you’ve used before,…

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Survey on Digital Games Use in the Classroom


A survey of grade school educators on using games in the classroom was recently released by the Games and Learning Publishing Council (funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation). While this survey isn’t directly applicable to those of us working in higher education, the adoption and success of games methods in K-12 will impact responses to those approaches when we try them in our classes with those students years later.

A few findings that stand out:

  • 55% of the surveyed teachers who incl…
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DHSI 2014: On Building

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I was one of some 600 people who gathered at the University of Victoria last week to participate in this year’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). A couple years ago, Natalie wrote a great post about DHSI that is still timely. I won’t repeat what she’s said. Rather, I want to reflect on the many ways that the Digital Humanities is all about building. I’m not interested in making an argument that Stephen Ramsey himself has backed away from since he made his controversial and provocative…

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Using Video Annotation Tools to Teach Film Analysis

[This is a guest post by Chuck Tryon, an Associate Professor of English at Fayetteville State University. He is the author of On-Demand Culture: Digital Delivery and the Future of Movies. He tweets under the handle @chutry.]

One of the biggest challenges I’ve faced in teaching undergraduate film courses is developing students’ close reading skills. This can include not only teaching the formal aspects of film—lighting, cinematography, sound, editing, and other techniques—but also aspects…

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Are We Solving the Right Problems?

Last week, our technology program brought in a trainer on Agile development methods, which is really an alternative approach to project management that’s particularly brought to bear on large software productions. One compelling aspect of the agile approach is the attempt to reconcile what every member of a team brings to a vision–including the difference between what a customer says and thinks they want, and what they really want. As we worked through strategies for continuous learning and ada…

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From the Archives: On Grading (II)

A stack of papers

Grading student assignments is a significant feature of many academics’ workload, especially as the end of semester nears. In the years since our first round up post, From the Archives: On Grading we’ve written quite a few useful posts about grading philosopies, tools, and approaches:

Philosophies and Methods

In Cross-Disciplinary Grading Techniques, Heather wrote about adopting humanities methods for grading open-ended assignments to her physics courses.

Ryan writes about how he can Avoid ‘Gra…

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Annotate Video on the Fly: A Review of VidBolt

Vidbolt_-_Watch__Share__and_Add_Comments_to_VideoAs a literature professor, I’m always looking for new ways to teach my students to pay close attention to what they are reading or watching. I’ve found that one of the best ways of doing this is through encouraging them to mark up their texts and have integrated shared annotations as an assignment in a few of my classes. But I’ve been limited to texts for these assignments so far. Because of this, I’m really excited by the pedagogical possibilities offered by Vidbolt, a new platform that allows …

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Five Lessons for Online Teaching from Finishing a MOOC

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[This is a guest post by Michelle Moravec, a historian currently working on the politics of women's culture, which you can read about at michellemoravec.com. Follow her on Twitter at @professmoravec.--@JBJ]

At the end of January 2014, I enrolled in an MOOC on corpus linguistics offered by the U.K.-based Open University’s Future Learn. CorpusMOOC, as it was affectionately known and hashtagged on Twitter, was billed as a “practical introduction to the methodology of corpus linguistics for resea…