Category Archives: Software

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Revisiting Mailbox for Managing Emails

Just over two years ago, I wrote about my early experiences with the Mailbox email application. Since then a lot has happened with Mailbox: it was acquired by Dropbox, for one, and it has released openly-available apps for iPad, iPhone, and Android Phones, as well as a beta desktop application for OS X. I’ve been using Mailbox since then—save one brief flirtation with Inbox for Gmail, which borrows many of Mailbox’s ideas and about which I may write soon—and wanted to write a brief followup.

Fi…

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Keeping Track of Your Public Writing With Contently

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[Lee Skallerup Bessette is a Faculty Instructional Consultant at the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CELT) at the University of Kentucky. She primarily works with faculty on digital pedagogy and digital humanities. She blogs at College Ready Writing and you can find her tweeting prolifically at @readywriting.--@JBJ]

I’ve written for ProfHacker before about freelance writing; given the proliferation of platforms, more and more academics are writing on and for various media o…

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Email Overload? A Review of Sanebox, an Email Management Tool

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I often refer to my inbox as the abyss from which few return, given how overwhelmed I generally am. Faced with a constant email deluge, I’m always worried that I will forget to answer important emails (I do), or even non-urgent ones that may fall off the face of the earth once they get buried at the bottom of my to-answer pile.

I’ve been trying out Sanebox, an email overload solution, for the past month and have been using it enough to warrant forking out money for their paid services. Sanebox …

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Making Story Games with Twine 2.0

I’ve written about many game tools here at ProfHacker, including Inform 7, Construct 2, and Inklewriter. One of my favorite platforms to work in personally is Twine. As I wrote previously, Twine is a powerful platform for building HTML5 games that can be played in the browser, and it works in a card-based model that’s very friendly to non-programmers. It’s very quick to pick up and go, so it’s something that can be brought into any discipline as a new way of engaging and expressing material. Re…

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Teaching with Wikipedia? The Wiki Education Foundation Wants to Help!

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I’ve written a number of ProfHacker articles on integrating Wikipedia into your classroom, such as this post on tips and tricks for teaching with Wikipedia and how to organize your own Wikipedia edit-a-thon. One of the biggest obstacles most instructors report facing, however, is simply learning how to use Wikipedia to the point where one feels comfortable enough to teach with it.

If this describes you, The Wiki Education Foundation wants to help. This separate arm of the Wikimedia foundation i…

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Managing Photos on Flickr

A Flicker (bird) on FlickrA lot of us here at ProfHacker have been using Flickr for quite a while. I like it well enough that I used to subscribe to Flickr Pro for the extra storage space, though I dropped the subscription when Flickr gave everyone a full terabyte of storage. I keep my personal photos there, as well as photos that I use for this blog. Every once in a while I have occasion to take a snapshot of the whiteboard in my classroom and share it with my students on our course website, and Flickr’s handy for that,…

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Stay Focused with the Momentum Extension

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One of the most important things you can do to enhance your productivity is to keep focusing on your highest priorities, the big important things, which can easily be obscured by the rush of urgent demands and everyday maintenance tasks. Even when you’ve taken the time to reflect on your roles and define your priorities, it’s easy to lose sight of them during the day.

The Momentum personal dashboard extension for the Chrome browser offers an appealing way to set a clear focus for the day and be…

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What Software Does Your Institution Provide Free or Cheap?

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The other day I was working on a project that required some image editing power. That’s not a typical requirement in my work, and so I didn’t have a good image editing program installed on my work computer. My first instinct was to download GIMP, a free alternative to Photoshop. I also spent some time exploring cheaper Photoshop alternatives, wondering if there was a good program with a solid user interface that wouldn’t cost too much.

Then, however, I remembered something I seem to forget ever…

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A Quick Look at OneNote for iPad

Handwriting in OneNote for iPadBack on February 19, Microsoft brought handwriting to the iPad.

I’d been waiting for that for a long time. I love Evernote (as do several of my colleagues here at ProfHacker, as is clear from the number of posts in which it gets a mention). I’m so fond of it, in fact, that I’m a premium subscriber, so I’m not about to walk away from it anytime soon. It’s fantastic for keeping track of information I want to access later.

But for creating notes that are free-form, or for quickly jotting down ideas…

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The Latest from Digital Humanities Questions and Answers

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Launched in September of 2010, Digital Humanities Questions & Answers is a joint venture of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and ProfHacker. (See Julie Meloni’s launch announcement.)

Digital Humanities Questions and Answers (@DHAnswers on Twitter) is designed to be a free resource where anyone with an interest in the digital humanities can pose a question to the community of folks working in the field.

Since we last checked in with the site, many interesting threads have b…