Category Archives: Software

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Switching from Evernote to OneNote, part 2

Book with notes flagged on pagesLast week, I explained why I made the decision to switch from Evernote to OneNote. This week, I want to give a brief overview of the how.

There are some important things to keep in mind:

  • Tags work wonderfully well in Evernote, and they’re highly customizable. OneNote has pre-defined tags. While some customization is possible, they simply don’t function the same way they do in Evernote. And for Mac users, at least, there’s no way that I’ve yet found to search tags (the function is available in t…
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CAST Figuration Seeks to Make Bootstrap More Accessible

Last summer I published a post about learning to use Bootstrap, “a free and open-source collection of tools for creating websites and web applications, [containing] HTML- and CSS-based design templates for typography, forms, buttons, navigation and other interface components, as well as optional JavaScript extensions” (Wikipedia entry on Bootstrap). Bootstrap is an extremely useful, free framework for web developers.

This summer, I was pleased to see the Center for Applied Special Technology (C…

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Switching from Evernote to OneNote, part 1

Book with notes flagged on pagesLast month, Jason alerted readers to Evernote’s recent price hike. It’s a hefty increase (for Premium users, from $49.99/year to $69.99).

I’m a longtime user of Evernote, and have found it very powerful for organizing information and locating it quickly. (I took the time a few years ago to go through my notes, winnow them, and organize them using the system Michael Hyatt describes in this post from a couple of years ago.) I’ve found the software so powerful that, for a number of years, I’ve …

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Use a Blogging Client as a Backup Method

As you may have read, author Dennis Cooper recently had his blog deleted from Google’s Blogspot platform without adequate explanation. My reaction to this story has been two-fold.

First, for anyone who has been writing online for any length of time, Cooper’s loss of several years’ worth of work is a sobering reminder that trusting your data to an online entity for safekeeping can lead to heartbreak. In situations like this, I would argue, Google needs to step up and provide not only a satisfyin…

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Getting Things Done with TaskPaper

taskpaperHeading

[This is a guest post by Nabeel Siddiqui, a doctoral candidate in American Studies at The College of William & Mary, where his research focuses on personal computers and the intersection of the public/private sphere. You can find him online here.--JBJ]

It’s safe to conclude the ProfHacker staff are fans of David Allen’s Getting Things Done. The book had a major influence on lifehacking , and a ton of software implements or uses its principles. Since starting graduate school, I have used Culture…

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How to Keep Your Laptop from Overusing Bandwidth on the Road

figurines of dogs in a toy car

As punishment for my various parenting sins, I now find myself in a specific Dunkin Donuts about five hours a week, while my son’s at practice. And so the ability to work remotely has skyrocketed in importance.

And whether I’m using my phone as a hotspot or using the Dunkin wifi (with a VPN, of course!), sometimes connections on the road aren’t as robust as one might like.

A solution that’s really helpful is TripMode, which gives you app-by-app control over what gets to talk to the internet on …

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Start Doing Things on the Command Line with Script Ahoy

cut up strips of paper

Getting comfortable with the command line is one of those little things that can open up a world of functionality on your computer. Lincoln Mullen started an occasional series, The ProfHacker Guide to the Command Line, which included posts on “Getting Comfortable on the Command Line”, and many more.

But sometimes you’re just getting started with the command line, and you’re pretty sure there’s probably a way to do a particular task, but you’re now sure how to go about it. To address this proble…

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Digital Distractions: Pokemon Go

Last week, Niantic Labs released a new mobile version of Pokemon, Pokemon Go. If you haven’t played one of the many previous Pokemon games on Nintendo consoles, the basic premise is exploring a world to capture and train adorable little monsters for a life of battles. Pokemon Go puts a twist on the model, inviting players to step outside and explore their own world while capturing monsters imposed over camera imagery. This makes for some awesome pictures (and selfies with Pokemon pre-capture) a…

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Two Great Tools for the Timezone-Challenged from World Time Buddy

clock distorted

Others on Prof Hacker have written on how to easily schedule meetings across timezones, including use of Google calendar for scheduling. but for someone like me who is constantly scheduling things with people on different timezones and also wanting to share livestreams with others, there are two tools I rely on pretty heavily.

1. World Time Buddy mobile app

The link to downloading the app is: https://www.worldtimebuddy.com/mobile-app. According to their website, the app helps you “visually conv…

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Like Evernote? Be Aware of Pricing Changes

hanging folders

Evernote is a fairly widely-used tool for corralling and then exploring information. There have been numerous posts about Evernote here at ProfHacker, such as Shawn Miller’s introduction to the tool, Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s testimonial as an Evernote convert, Amy’s account of teaching with it, and a variety of posts about using Evernote on your phone, with Markdown, or in web browsers.

There is a long tradition of speculating on Evernote’s business model–although it has a lot of users, most of …