Category Archives: Software

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Cross-Platform Applications for Daily Work

Multiple operating systems in actionSometimes our readers give us good ideas for posts. After my post about fully replacing ChromeOS with Linux, a reader asked what Linux software I use for academic purposes. I suggested Zotero for PDF management, and also pointed him to Steven Ovadia’s @steven_ovadia blog — which has an “academic” tag — for further ideas.

In case other readers are interested (or have recommendations of their own to share!), I thought it worth mentioning some other applications academics might find useful.

My firs…

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A Game A Day at HILT

paperpusher I’ve been blogging about Games in the Classroom here on ProfHacker for some time, and I’m very excited to be putting some of these lessons together in a week-long institute as part of the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching institute at the University of Maryland this summer, August 4th–8th. We’ll be taking some of the lessons learned from “game a week” to the next level with a “game a day” workshop. You can see the full breakdown and resources for the workshop here. If you’re interested…

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Editorial is a Powerful, Flexible iOS App for Text Editing

[This is a guest post by Jason A. Heppler, the Academic Technology Specialist in the Department of History at Stanford University and a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Jason tweets at @jaheppler.]

There are a great many text editors on iOS, the operating system for iPhone and iPad. Just one glance at Brett Terpstra’s list of markdown editors can attest to the range of offerings available on the platform.

Editorial — available in the iOS app store — stands above the rest.

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Tools for Transitions: Finding A New Home


For most of us in academia, big transitions are inevitable. We move from graduate school in one state to a postdoc or fellowship in another and perhaps through several such temporary positions in search of permanence. And, even if found, permanence can be an illusion as needs of departments, family ties, and other life considerations get in the way. I’m in the midst of a big transition this summer: I’m relocating to Orlando for a new job at the University of Central Florida. So as I navigate th…

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Use Copy for Cloud Storage Backup and File Sharing

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[Jason A. Heppler is the Academic Technology Specialist in the Department of History at Stanford University and a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He tweets at @jaheppler.]

Recent announcements are showing a trend in cheaper storage solutions and cloud backups. Google recently updated its pricing for Drive storage and now offers 15 GB for free and incredibly cheap prices for 100 GB, 1 TB, and 10TB+. At WWDC, Apple announced changes to its iCloud service towards …

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Select and Click: PopClip Makes Text Manipulation Easy on the Mac

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[This is a guest post by Jim Cracraft, a Language Teaching Specialist and technology coordinator at Vanderbilt University's English Language Center (ELC), which offers English language support to individuals who have a first language other than English. He can be reached through the center's website: http://vanderbilt.edu/elc/ --@JBJ]

As a longtime Mac user who does not own an iOS device, I have been somewhat reluctant to embrace the steady “iOS-ification” of the Mac–you know, the aesthetic and…

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DHSI 2014: On Building

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I was one of some 600 people who gathered at the University of Victoria last week to participate in this year’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). A couple years ago, Natalie wrote a great post about DHSI that is still timely. I won’t repeat what she’s said. Rather, I want to reflect on the many ways that the Digital Humanities is all about building. I’m not interested in making an argument that Stephen Ramsey himself has backed away from since he made his controversial and provocative…

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Using Video Annotation Tools to Teach Film Analysis

[This is a guest post by Chuck Tryon, an Associate Professor of English at Fayetteville State University. He is the author of On-Demand Culture: Digital Delivery and the Future of Movies. He tweets under the handle @chutry.]

One of the biggest challenges I’ve faced in teaching undergraduate film courses is developing students’ close reading skills. This can include not only teaching the formal aspects of film—lighting, cinematography, sound, editing, and other techniques—but also aspects…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Twitter Tools for Summer


It’s no secret that many of us at ProfHacker are big fans of Twitter, using it for everything from conferences to classes to bot-making to, yes, posting pictures of our cats. Several ProfHackers have shared their favorite tools and hacks for working with Twitter: Natalie gathered several of them in her recent retrospective post. This last weekend served as another reminder that Twitter can be a powerful place to experience a simultaneous happening, as the fallout from Friday’s shooting at the U…

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Tools I Use: Online Noise Generators

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We’ve written before at ProfHacker about choosing your playlist to change your life, about creating a soundtrack for the semester, about choosing songs for the pace of your desired daily run, and about noise-cancelling headphones when you just want silence.

But sometimes you don’t want either music or silence, but just the right sort of background noise. Many people love Coffitivity, a site (and also mobile app) that offers the background noise typical of a coffee shop. Although I often work re…