Category Archives: Reviews

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Dancing in the Rain? Underwater Audio Review

10289242945_373324ff29_z Thanks to a stress fracture in my foot, I’ve been spending a lot of time underwater lately. Swimming laps and pool running is the only kind of exercise my injured self can tolerate right now, so it’s what I’m doing. But as some of you know, pool running in particular, is about as exciting as watching paint dry. Upon hearing my complain, one of the other pool regulars suggested that I look into a waterproof iPod, and just like that, my life changed.

Before that day, I didn’t know that there was …

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Games in the Classroom Reading List

 Last week on Twitter, I was asked for some recommendation for critical readings on games and learning. There are lots of enthusiasts for games in the classroom out there (myself included, of course) and tons of great places to start if you’re interested in learning more about bringing games into education. These are only the tip of the iceberg–there’s a particularly rich conversation in game studies surrounding serious and persuasive games, which is decidedly interwoven with educational games.

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Editorial is a Powerful, Flexible iOS App for Text Editing

[This is a guest post by Jason A. Heppler, the Academic Technology Specialist in the Department of History at Stanford University and a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Jason tweets at @jaheppler.]

There are a great many text editors on iOS, the operating system for iPhone and iPad. Just one glance at Brett Terpstra’s list of markdown editors can attest to the range of offerings available on the platform.

Editorial — available in the iOS app store — stands above the rest.

Continue reading

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Select and Click: PopClip Makes Text Manipulation Easy on the Mac

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[This is a guest post by Jim Cracraft, a Language Teaching Specialist and technology coordinator at Vanderbilt University's English Language Center (ELC), which offers English language support to individuals who have a first language other than English. He can be reached through the center's website: http://vanderbilt.edu/elc/ --@JBJ]

As a longtime Mac user who does not own an iOS device, I have been somewhat reluctant to embrace the steady “iOS-ification” of the Mac–you know, the aesthetic and…

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Tom Bihn’s Travel Bags for Conference Travel

TB0940_01bWhen I moved to the Boston area and began commuting two years ago, I asked ProfHacker readers to recommend a good backpack for commuting. So many recommended Tom Bihn backpacks that I got one, and I loved it. So when I was preparing for a series of work-related trips this spring, I wanted to test out Tom Bihn’s travel bags for these 2- or 3-night trips. The company provided me with an Aeronaut, a Tri-Star, and a Pilot bag so I could test them all, along with a set of packing cubes and pouches to…

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Grabbing Text from Images with Project Naptha

I’ve lost a lot of hours to copying text from scans and photos of documents I’ve found on the web or taken for my own records. Some websites (particularly older websites that relied too much on flash or image files for their design) are particularly annoying to cite because nothing can be copied and pasted. While optical character recognition (OCR) software has come a long way, most of what I need isn’t worth the investment or the time of using specialized software. However, this might finally …

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Annotate Video on the Fly: A Review of VidBolt

Vidbolt_-_Watch__Share__and_Add_Comments_to_VideoAs a literature professor, I’m always looking for new ways to teach my students to pay close attention to what they are reading or watching. I’ve found that one of the best ways of doing this is through encouraging them to mark up their texts and have integrated shared annotations as an assignment in a few of my classes. But I’ve been limited to texts for these assignments so far. Because of this, I’m really excited by the pedagogical possibilities offered by Vidbolt, a new platform that allows …

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Exploring Trading Consequences

In March, a fantastic new resource for studying the history of commodity trade was announced: Trading Consequences.

The project is the product of several years of collaboration between York University, Canada, the University of Edinburgh, UK, the University of St Andrews, UK and the University of Saskatchewan, Canada.

The resource provides multiple interfaces to a rich database of mentions of commodities and locations associated with commodities from the 18th century and up to the mid-20th cent…

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Reading Brigid Schulte’s Overwhelmed

I recently returned from “Spring Break,” a week that sounded relaxing when I was an undergraduate and has seemed to diminish every year since. Appropriately, Brigid Schulte’s book Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time came out just in time to land on my spring break reading list.

In her review, Jennifer Howard observed that

[f]or many of us, life unspools as a never-ending to-do list…Weekends, which ought to be oases of leisure, have their own hectic rhythms: errands, chor…

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How to Help Others Find Your Work: Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work


One of my weirdest scholarly tics is a tendency to bury the most interesting or original part of my argument. The clearest example of this is my relationship with psychoanalysis. On the one hand, I do love Lacan and Freud, and I’m pretty sure that I could talk you around to my way of reading them. On the other hand, I almost *never* talk about it. (A quick search of my main pre-ProfHacker blog returns a mere 2 posts on Lacan, which surprises even me.)

This is weird for several reasons: I end u…