Category Archives: Profession

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How Do You Work with Your Tablet?

10053155455_bcc06e19ba_kThis afternoon brings yet another set of Apple announcements–definitely new iPads, a specific release date for the new Mac operating system, and apparently retina displays for the iMac. And whenever Apple releases a product, other folks do also, with Google announcing the Nexus 9 that runs the new Android Lollipop OS..

The run of tablet announcements always makes me a bit curious: Are academics using them for work? In what ways? Obviously, we’ve covered tons of different ways people might use ta…

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Reforming Shared Governance?

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I won’t spend the whole week recapitulating Rice’s De Lange conference on “Teaching in the University of Tomorrow” (see yesterday’s post on “Seeding Social Media”) but I did want to draw folks’ attention to one more thing: William Bowen’s talk on technology and changing American priorities related to higher education.

Bowen describes the financial and demographic challenged facing higher education, and argues for a more technologically coherent platform that would help colleges deliver course…

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Seeding Social Media

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This week, Rice has hosted a fascinating conference on “Teaching in the University of Tomorrow,” which is trying to think about teaching, technology, and the changing higher ed landscape. You can find out more about the conference here or by viewing the conference’s active, boisterous hashtag, #delange9.

I wanted to post about it because of the conference’s design: most of the keynotes are by very elite presenters (system chancellors, college presidents, founders of startups), paired with ver…

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Updating the Three-Envelope Method for the Digital Age

Envelopes

So you’ve written an article and sent it off to be considered for publication in a journal. You wait. And wait. And wait. And then when you eventually get a response, perhaps it’s a rejection, or a revise and resubmit.

What do you do next?

No one likes disappointment, but academics have to get used to the experience of rejection and figure out ways to manage it. A lot of people find themselves so crushed by rejection or negative feedback on a piece of writing that they set it aside and never re…

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CFP: ‘Accessible Future’ Workshop in Lincoln, NE

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Here at ProfHacker, we’ve published a number of things over the years about accessibility in digital environments. And regular readers will remember that last September we announced the first Accessible Future workshop, which took place in Boston last semester. After Boston, we led a workshop in Austin, Texas.

Now we’re accepting applications for our third workshop, which will be held on November 14 and 15, 2014 in Lincoln, Nebraska. If you are interested in digital environments and accessibili…

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What Twitter Changes Might Mean for Academics


If you’re a regular user of Twitter, as many of us at ProfHacker are, you’ve no doubt seen the many posts speculating on Twitter’s impeding demise. Twitter, along with every other social network, gets declared dead on a regular basis. However, earlier this year Adrienne LaFrance and Robinson Meyer wrote “A Eulogy for Twitter” in the Atlantic and observed:

“ Twitter’s earnings last quarter, after all, were an improvement on the period before, and it added 14 million new users for a total of 255 …

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Visualize Your Promotion Portfolio with Cmap

[This is a guest post by Janine Utell, who is an Associate Professor of English at Widener University in Pennsylvania. She teaches composition and 19th and 20th century British literature; she has also facilitated a number of on- and off-campus workshops on writing, critical thinking, and general education. Previously at ProfHacker, she’s written on “Practical Wisdom and Professional Life” and “How to Study Your Own Teaching (And Why You Might Want To).” You can follow Janine on Twitter: @jan…

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Five Ways to Say No

say no to yes Do you ever find yourself attending an event or participating in a project that you don’t really have time for, aren’t interested in, or won’t benefit from in some personal or professional way? It happens to all of us. It can usually be traced back to that moment when you agreed to do the project, or attend the meeting, even though you already knew you didn’t want to. Or maybe you did think you wanted to attend – it seemed like a reasonable thing to do, or you wanted to support the person or gr…

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From the Archives: the First Week of the Academic Term

Classroom The ProfHacker archives are full of useful ideas, tools, and advice relevant to the first week of a new academic semester or quarter. In addition to the posts highlighted below, you may want to check out some previous From the Archives posts on New Semester, New Year, Creating Syllabi, and Grading.

Teaching: the first week

  • Brian’s So Now You’re A Teacher is aimed at new instructors, but contains useful reminders for anyone heading back into the classroom.

  • The ProfHacker team assembled a li…

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Citing Syllabi

5167905071_e42568a44f_zMy first experience in the syllabi bakery was years ago while doing some tech support for a certain well-known scholar. She was staring at the beginnings of a reading list on her office computer while I tried to restore a dead laptop. Suddenly, she jumped to her feet and began to browse through her impressive collection of books, ‘Agency,’ she mumbled, ‘I need to assign something on agency.’ The professor was still on a search for agency when I left.

Wow, that looks hard, I thought. Having read …