Category Archives: Profession

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Mellon Funding for the Open Library of the Humanities

Stacks of the José Vasconcelos Library in Mexico City from Wikipedia>

Here’s some exciting news for readers interested in experiments in academic publishing: the Open Library of the Humanities has just received a substantial Mellon Foundation grant to build its technological platform, business model, journal and monograph pilot scheme.

The Open Library of the Humanities (OLH) — run by the enterprising Martin Paul Eve (@martin_eve) and Caroline Edwards (@the_blochian) — is an ambitious project to replicate the Public Library of Science (PLoS) project for the huma…

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Remembering the 2013 Boston Marathon with the Our Marathon Archive

5ee847e668198e774022be574d3716b2Today marks the one-year anniversary of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and subsequent events that shook the city of Boston. I teach at Northeastern University, blocks from the Marathon’s finish line, and many of our students were directly affected by those events: they were participating in the race, they were helping in the medical tents, they were cheering on friends and family, or they lived in buildings that were evacuated during the tense days following the bombings. Some of our students…

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A Not-so-gentle Reminder about Security: Heartbleed

A couple of days before yesterday’s post was scheduled to run, we started hearing about the Heartbleed Bug.

This is a nasty one. It’s been out for quite a while, and it’s a flaw in a software library that’s used by a very high number of websites. Check the link above for the details of just how nasty the bug is.

What can readers do to protect their data?

An important part of the necessary response is beyond any individual user’s control. If a website was using the affected version of OpenSSL, i…

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A Gentle Reminder about Security

Padlocks

[Editor's note: We will publish a follow-up post next week tomorrow about the Heartbleed Bug, which has been making headlines this week. You can read this follow-up post here.]

There are a lot of benefits to doing much of our work online. Collaboration with far-away colleagues is easy, we can have ready access to our work no matter what device we’re using, and having our work backed up in the cloud can be reassuring.

But there’s danger as well, unfortunately. In just the past two months, at lea…

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Good University Service Means Self-Replacement

Usually, when people complain about faculty and service, it’s along a few well-defined paths: faculty who shirk service; the resulting disproportionate service burden; or how nothing ever gets done.  There is, however, another problem: the faculty member who won’t let go.

Example 1: I’m always a little sad to see requests of the following type: “Due to the unusual expertise of Prof. X, we request a waiver of the term limit for the committee for gerundal pontification & beard-stroking.”  Now, s…

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How to Run a Group-Authored Blog


Independently of each other, a small number of people have recently asked about the workflow involved in publishing a group-authored blog like ProfHacker.

Now I don’t pretend that the way we do things is the best way possible, but I’m happy to describe how we go about publishing 2 posts a day, 5 days a week.

If you’re involved in a similar project that uses a different workflow, feel free to share the details in the comments to this post.
Continue reading

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Open Thread Wednesday: Taking Stock and Thinking Ahead


On my campus the semester has just about a month of regular classes left, which means that it’s time to start taking stock of what’s been done, what’s almost finished, and what still needs to be wrapped up. Committee deadlines approach, student projects near completion, and research tasks need to be completed over the next month or so. How much time is left in the term on your campus? What kinds of plans are you making? How do you make sure that everything that needs to get taken care of actual…

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Reading Brigid Schulte’s Overwhelmed

I recently returned from “Spring Break,” a week that sounded relaxing when I was an undergraduate and has seemed to diminish every year since. Appropriately, Brigid Schulte’s book Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time came out just in time to land on my spring break reading list.

In her review, Jennifer Howard observed that

[f]or many of us, life unspools as a never-ending to-do list…Weekends, which ought to be oases of leisure, have their own hectic rhythms: errands, chor…

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Join the Global Women Write In #GWWI on Wikipedia Tomorrow!

global women write in logoDespite being open to anyone to edit, Wikipedia has been criticized for its gender gap. To help remedy this, Postcolonial Digital Humanities is organizing a Global Women Write-In (#GWWI) on Wikipedia all-day tomorrow on March 18! 

Why Global Women? 

 If you’ve ever tried doing a Wikipedia search for important women theorists around the world, you might be surprised to note how short the entries are, particularly on their work and their ideas (for example: Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Gayatri Spivak,

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A Failure a Week

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Here at ProfHacker, we’re always looking at new things to try. The options can be overwhelming, and as Michelle Moravec noted in her look at digital humanities tools, sometimes it’s hard to know what to invest time in. Last week, Mark Danger Chen tweeted a link to a post by Adriel Wallick: “Make many games, learn many things.” The approach comes from an article on Gamasutra by Rami Ismail on making “A Game A Week.” The method is more about getting moving than creating anything “good”–on…