Category Archives: Profession

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Susan Cain’s Quiet Revolution

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In personality typologies derived from the work of Carl Jung, introverts are described as people who gain energy from solitude and extroverts as people who gain energy from being around other people. Understanding where you fall on the introvert-extrovert spectrum can help you understand your own energy patterns and how best to work with them within your professional and personal life. (As an introvert, for example, after attending several sessions at an academic conference and interacting with…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Summer Travel Abroad

I’ve been very fortunate this summer to spend a lot of time traveling, both for conferences and research.

Here are a few of the things I’ve changed now that I’m more accustomed to international travel:

  • Buy a data plan. I wrote a couple of years ago about the challenges of traveling abroad without a data plan. While some countries are fantastic for WiFi access, many locations worth visiting simply require the investment of a data plan for peace of mind and, more importantly, navigation. Many of…
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Beyond Twitter: Virtually Connecting at Conferences

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[This is a guest post by Rebecca J. Hogue and Maha Bali. Rebecca J. Hogue (@rjhogue) is an itinerant scholar and prolific blogger (http://rjh.goingeast.ca, http://bcbecky.com, and http://goingeast.ca. Professionally, she helps develop and produce self-published eBooks, teaches Emerging Technologies and Instructional Design online, and programs eLearning modules (Articulate Storyline). Her research and innovation interests are in the areas of online collaboration, social media, and blogging. Mah…

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Re-evaluating the Risks of Public Scholarship


Last week I attended the HASTAC Conference, an interdisciplinary conference from the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (one of the oldest and most active academic social networks around). HASTAC is dedicated to public scholarship: many of its initiatives are based around blogging and sharing ideas through the social network, and the conference included livestreaming many sessions for a virtual conference, with a very active Twitter feed supported by designated…

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A Bill of Rights for Student Collaborators

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One exciting aspect of digital humanities work is its openness to collaboration, including collaboration with students. As someone who used to coordinate an undergraduate research program, I’ve always been particularly excited about opportunities to involve students in meaningful research–and participating actively in an ongoing research project certainly counts!

But undergraduate participation in research also raises a whole host of thorny questions–around compensation, around acknowledgment, …

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Being a Caregiver with an Academic Career

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[Tim Lepczyk is the Director of Faculty Instructional Technology at Hendrix College. You can follow him on Twitter at @thirdcoast.--@JBJ]

There is research to perform. Lectures to prepare. Exams to grade. Articles to write and meetings to attend. The life of a professor is like the pulse of an airport: arrivals, departures, a steady stream of events all lining up against a timetable. It’s a hard balance between commitments and managing one’s time. However, when a longterm care situation combine…

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Serendipitous Learning on Twitter

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[Maha Bali is Associate Professor of Practice at the Center for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo, Egypt. Her primary role is a faculty developer but she also teaches educational game design to undergrads and ed tech to in-service teachers. She is a co-facilitator of edcontexts.org and columnist at Hybrid Pedagogy. She blogs at http://blog.mahabali.me and tweets @bali_maha.–@JBJ

I really appreciated this recent Chronicle Conversation post by Thomas Fisher in which he rec…

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Traveling Light

A packed carry-on suitcase and backpackAh, summer, when it’s not uncommon to be traveling. Last year, I had some international travel, and one of the things that helped me survive was a keyboard case for my iPad, which enabled me to leave my laptop at home even though I had a lot of writing to do.

This year, I’m traveling internationally again, though it’s a shorter trip this time (six days instead of three weeks). I really don’t want to fuss with having to check bags, so I’m packing very light, which is something of a first for me (…

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One Bag Academic Travel


Summer often brings an increase in both personal and academic travel, as the shift from a regular class schedule often lends time for study abroad, extended conferences and workshops, and other events. I have a lot of this type of travel going this summer, and sometimes I’m home for what feels like only a few hours before I need to repack my bag for the next event. With all of the extra fees for airline travel, there’s more incentive than ever to pack light for every trip, without paying checke…

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Designing and Adapting Projects For All Users: Digital Accessibility Workshop (July 27-31)

Today being Global Accessibility Awareness Day, you might be interested in finding opportunities for learning more about the topic of accessibility in digital environments. If that’s the case, then you are in luck: later this summer, Erin Templeton and I will be teaching a workshop entitled Digital Accessibility: Designing and Adapting Projects For All Users at HILT (Humanities Intensive Learning & Teaching) 2015.

What can you expect from this workshop? Here’s our course description:

In order t…