Category Archives: Productivity

by

Are You Fully Charged?

charging laptop

Tom Rath’s 2015 book, Are You Fully Charged? The 3 Keys to Energizing Your Work and Life, focuses on three areas that contribute to a daily experience of greater engagement, well-being, and productivity — what Rath calls being “fully charged.” These three areas are:

Meaning: doing something that benefits another person
Interactions: creating for more positive than negative moments
Energy: making choices that improve your mental and physical health
(p.7)

Throughout the numerous short chapters th…

by

Three Words for the New Semester

One of my favorite things about the rhythms of academic life is that we get to start fresh several times a year. A new semester brings new students, new courses, new research opportunities, and the chance to try doing something a bit differently.

Here at ProfHacker, Amy’s written before about setting New Year’s resolutions to improve on the previous semester’s experience, and Anastasia’s written about setting teaching resolutions for a new semester.

To focus my intentions and actions for the ne…

by

Doing Focused Work in Distracted Times: Cal Newport’s Deep Work

Cat, staring intently

Although the book didn’t quite arrive in time for New Year’s resolutions (which are junk anyway), 2016 has already seen the publication of Cal Newport’s eagerly-awaited new title, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World (Grand Central Publishing), which promises to offer research-driven guidelines for doing meaningful work. And it’s pretty successful at this goal!

Cal Newport is the prior author of So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work…

by

Starting off in Markdown with Word-to-Markdown

Piece of paper with Markdown formatting

Over the years, we’ve written a lot about Markdown–the simple, human-readable language for formatting text–here at ProfHacker. Lincoln wrote an introductory post about it a few years back, and followed that up with one on Pandoc, a tool that lets you convert all manner of text documents ond another on Markdownifier, a tool that lets you grab plain text from (almost) any web page. We’ve had several posts on tools for writing in Markdown: Cory on WikiPack, Mark on Gonzo, me on TextDrop, Natalie o…

by

Making Live-Tweeting Easier with Noter Live

Got Hash Tag?

Conference season is upon us, with both the MLA and the AHA (among others) coming up this weekend.

Profhacker has a long list of posts about live-tweeting conference panels:

One of the challenges I’ve had in live-tweeting is keeping track of the hashtag, as well as the speakers’ …

by

Year-End Reflection

cardinal

The end of the semester is a natural time for reflection and planning, and with the calendar year drawing to a close, you may feel added impetus to review the past four, six, or twelve months. Review and reflection about what actually happened over that time is an important step to take before jumping in to setting goals or resolutions for the new year or new semester.

Here are a few questions that can help with end of the semester or end of the year review. Set aside a block of time where you …

by

The Now Page Movement

clocks

Setting clear priorities for how you’re going to use your time and energy can often be a challenge. For academics, figuring out how to arrange the competing demands of research, teaching, and service is but one part of the larger challenge of creating a work-life balance that serves you well. And many professionals today are struggling to keep focused on important projects amidst a flood of incoming emails and meeting requests.

The /now page movement

A few weeks ago, Derek Sivers created a /now

by

Tune In to Focus at Will

water drops

Our brains are designed to pay attention to novelty in our environment: at the most basic level, early in our evolution, novelty often meant danger — a predator approaching in the forest, say, or a severe storm approaching. So even as you’re focusing on a task, some portion of your brain is still busy scanning the environment for change, even when those changes are not likely to signify life-threatening conditions. If your brain is easily alerted, it can make it difficult to focus your attentio…

by

Tweeting with Collaborators: Group Tweet vs TweetDeck Teams

8477893426_e4bd8aa5df_b

Have you ever worked with a team of different people, all of you needing access to the same Twitter account (representing an organization or project you all work on) at different times? Of course, the intuitive thing to do is to share the password to the account, and to all be logged on to it. However, this is not optimal for several reasons:

  1. If you are like me in a different country from your collaborators (most of mine are in North America), Twitter gets suspicious and will put you through …

by

Visualizing Your Searches with Trailblazer

IMG_2097
I’ve been writing about my use of Hypothes.is as a collaborative annotation tool this semester with the students in our introduction to literature class (see my ProfHacker post from this summer on my selection process). The tool so far has been a huge success and the students have been getting a lot out of the process. But one thing that has stumped me is how to help them navigate the process of actually going online and starting to find the contextual and referential materials they need to fin…