Category Archives: Hardware

by

ProfHacker 2014 Holiday Gift Guide

Round trees at night, lit with holiday lights Why is this post different from all other posts? Because it’s the annual ProfHacker gift guide! If December is a busy time for most people, it’s always seemed that much busier to me since becoming an academic: there’s finals, grades, and all those department parties competing for my attention when what I really need to do is figure out what I should get my wife. That’s where this guide comes in. We’ve got the recommendations you need for the coffee / exercise / tech enthusiast in your life, as …

by

Doxie Portable Scanners Get a Wifi Upgrade

doxiego-bike

For a couple of years now, I’ve been fond of the Doxie line of portable scanners. Three years ago, I looked at the Doxie Go (as did Konrad!), and two years ago I reviewed the second version, the Doxie One. Last year’s model, the Doxie Flip, didn’t really fit into my life very well, but this year’s upgrades to the Doxie Go are pretty terrific.

The Doxie Go Plus mostly offers better battery life and better quality images, with 300 and 600dpi scans available. This scanner syncs to your computer vi…

by

Gear Review: UnderwaterAudio Swimbuds Sport Waterproof Headphones

6891221163_c6b0499fd6_z

 

Several weeks ago, I reviewed the Underwater Audio Waterproof iPod, which I came upon over the course of several weeks of pool time thanks to a metatarsal stress fracture. The waterproof iPod may not have saved my life, but it has definitely saved my sanity, such as it is, over the course of hours of pool running, which if you haven’t had the pleasure, is great exercise, but is also as exciting as watching paint dry.

A few weeks ago, I was contacted by UnderwaterAudio (UA) and asked if I woul…

by

How Do You Work with Your Tablet?

10053155455_bcc06e19ba_kThis afternoon brings yet another set of Apple announcements–definitely new iPads, a specific release date for the new Mac operating system, and apparently retina displays for the iMac. And whenever Apple releases a product, other folks do also, with Google announcing the Nexus 9 that runs the new Android Lollipop OS..

The run of tablet announcements always makes me a bit curious: Are academics using them for work? In what ways? Obviously, we’ve covered tons of different ways people might use ta…

by

Dancing in the Rain? Underwater Audio Review

10289242945_373324ff29_z Thanks to a stress fracture in my foot, I’ve been spending a lot of time underwater lately. Swimming laps and pool running is the only kind of exercise my injured self can tolerate right now, so it’s what I’m doing. But as some of you know, pool running in particular, is about as exciting as watching paint dry. Upon hearing my complain, one of the other pool regulars suggested that I look into a waterproof iPod, and just like that, my life changed.

Before that day, I didn’t know that there was …

by

A Quick ProfHack: Kindling the Presentation

6668244985_83a6961358_z

 

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of speaking at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria. If you haven’t attended (and didn’t have your Twitter stream flooded with #DHSI2014 tweets), DHSI is a week-long Digital Humanities extravaganza, which you can read about in a previous ProfHacker post. I was participating in one of the new “Birds of a Feather” discussions, which asked two provocateurs to make short presentations and then would open up into a discussion wi…

by

DHSI 2014: On Building

238681391_184c74ee8e_z

I was one of some 600 people who gathered at the University of Victoria last week to participate in this year’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). A couple years ago, Natalie wrote a great post about DHSI that is still timely. I won’t repeat what she’s said. Rather, I want to reflect on the many ways that the Digital Humanities is all about building. I’m not interested in making an argument that Stephen Ramsey himself has backed away from since he made his controversial and provocative…

by

More Chromebook Fun: Fully Replacing ChromeOS with Linux


Last November, I wrote about running Ubuntu on a Chromebook using ChrUbuntu. In that post, I noted some of the advantages of running ChrUbuntu: I really liked having a full-blown desktop environment to work in, and ChrUbuntu worked much better for me than Crouton.

There were still some issues, though. I couldn’t choose the operating system at startup; switching back to ChromeOS required issuing a terminal command and rebooting the machine. If I wanted to boot back into Ubuntu, I had to issue a …

by

Toward a Better Charging Cable

tangled cables

For all the ubiquity of wireless devices on and around college campuses, cables are still a necessary evil. Brian has offered tricks for taming behind-the-desk cables before, and George has plugged velcro cable ties, which I have developed a new appreciation for this year.

Phone chargers present a slightly different challenge than, for example, the power brick for your router. For one thing, you probable move it more. And if you live or work with others, probably other people also need to power…