Category Archives: Editorial

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Weekend Reading: Where’s the Hurry Edition

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Now that it’s the middle of July, the universal cry across college campuses has been, “why does the summer go so quickly?” After all, the Premier League’s season is only a month away–and with Liverpool yet to sign a world-class striker!

Wait–that’s not why, well, except for my 11yo. Many faculty are concerned because their summer plans–whether for writing or course planning or recovering–are starting to run out of days. Likewise, the countdown is on for all of the staff plans for getting their …

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Tools for Transitions: Preparing to Move

moving I am in the middle of the first real move of my adult life. While I’ve been in and out of dorms and apartments, I’ve never ventured far from my home state for long, and much of my stuff has been accumulating in the same room for twenty years. I’ve been unearthing papers from grade school, papers from graduate school, over-sized clothes, under-sized clothes, books that are falling apart at the seams, unread books, and the occasional unclaimed student project. Being a Profhacker-type, I initiall…

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Weekend Reading: Umbrellas in Portugal Edition

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Happy Weekend, ProfHacker friends!

The title and image for today’s Weekend Reading comes from the Ágitagueda art festival, an annual tradition in Portugal this month that was recently featured in Bored Panda.

If you have even a fleeting interest in the digital humanities, it is well-worth your while to check out Bethany Nowviskie’s keynote address, “Digital Humanities in the Anthropocene,” from the 2014 DH Conference which just wrapped up in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Lots going on this weekend: pe…

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Weekend Reading: Walking a Cabbage Edition

3291171324_e9b8c284f6_z Happy weekend, ProfHackers!

For many of us, summer means spending time outside, whether walking our dog (or a cabbage–see below!), taking kids to the pool or mowing the grass. But summer is also tick season, and with ticks, increasingly, comes Lyme disease. Even if you are not a runner, this article in Runner’s World magazine details the early symptoms of Lyme disease, treatment options and prevention. The Huffigton Post shares nine things to know about tickborne illness. If you do happen to ge…

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Open Thread Wednesday: How Fitness-Friendly Is Your Campus?

Bicycling Magazine just published their list of “9 Great Colleges for Cyclists,” and it’s got me thinking about the extent to which a campus does — or doesn’t — make infrastructure choices that encourage cycling or walking (or running) as a means of getting from place to place.

For example, when I went to a conference at Stanford University a few years ago, I was especially impressed by what seemed to be a very robust campus bike community. As the above linked article explains,

The California s…

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Weekend Reading: Butterflies in the Sky Edition

4017103295_7b7ee92569_bThere’s not much of a theme to today’s reading list. Perhaps this is appropriate for a summer Friday. In any case, enjoy!

  • First (and this could take your whole weekend, and that would be okay), there’s the #YesAllWomen hashtag, which began in the wake of the UCSB shootings. If you’ve not yet, spend some time with the tweets and with the many articles of essential reading to which they link.
  • This week the MLA’s Task Force on Doctoral Study in Language and Literature released its report, which ma…
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Weekend Reading: Memorial Day Weekend Edition

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Happy Memorial Day Weekend, ProfHackers! Before we launch into the Weekend Reading, we wanted to take a moment a remember those who have served our country both at home and abroad. Thank you for your service and your sacrifice.

Laura Miller, writer for Salon.com has broken up with Amazon. Citing the online everything seller’s increasingly monopolistic tactics, she points to the recent scuffle with Hachette books, reported by the New York Times, where Amazon has delayed shipment of certain Hache…

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Weekend Reading: Kirschantwort Roundup Edition

1117742262_7bc9d99769_bAfter a very long winter, it’s finally feeling a bit like summer in New England—it seems we simply missed spring altogether. Most classes are finished (unless, like me, you’re teaching a summer class) and faculty are busy trying to get started on full summer to-do lists. This weekend’s reading will primarily be of interest to readers who care about the digital humanities. If that’s a topic you’d rather skip, skip away. Otherwise, I’ve tried to round up a recent set of articles discussing the sha…

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Open Thread Wednesday: End-of-Term Self-Care Habits?

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It’s the end of the semester, which often means a kind of grading logjam occurs: “Must get late-term assignments done before the final exams/papers/projects come flooding in!” (Otherwise, the well-known Ross Geller method threatens to take over.)

In other words, folks get overworked and tired. And overworked, tired folks often fall back on comforting routines that might not be healthy in the long run, but provide just enough order amid the chaos to get you through. I myself have been known rely…

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Weekend Reading: One-Star Lighthouse Edition

7864958264_9c1ebb736a_bIt’s been a busy week, and I have lots of reading for you. So here ’tis:

  • There’s been a very active conversation about Net Neutrality and higher education this week. I would recommend a few posts for those looking to learn more or join the conversation:
    1. This joint post from Adeline Koh and Siobhan Senier here at ProfHacker, “Why Net Neutrality Matters to Higher Ed,” includes several relevant links, a nice breakdown of the issues at stake in this debate, and a few concrete ways to get involved.