Category Archives: Editorial

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Weekend Reading: Trick or Treat Edition

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Happy Halloween ProfHackers! We hope that your day is full of treats and light on tricks.

For your weekend reading:

Apparently, Craigslist is not just for hook-ups and used furniture anymore. The Atlantic reports that people are also using it to list cemetery plots: “Shopping for Secondhand Graves on Craigslist.” While we are on the topic of burial, NPR ran an interview with mortician Caitlyn Doughty, author of Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and Other Lessons from the Crematory, a couple weeks ago. I…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Favorite Podcasts & Podcast Players?

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Every so often, we like to check in and see what podcasts people like to listen to. These might be for work, for self-improvement, or just for fun. Whatever the motivation might be, it’s always interesting to find out what other people are listening to.

I almost always listen to podcasts at two times: driving to/from work or the 11yo’s soccer practice, or while doing the dishes. On balance, that means I *subscribe* to fewer podcasts that are directly about work-type topics and more that are fun…

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Weekend Reading: Changing Leaves Edition

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Another Friday is here, and that means another edition of Weekend Reading.

Tuesday, October 14 was E. E. Cumming’s birthday. In honor of his birthday, a piece from The New Yorker by Paul Muldoon has been making the rounds on social media. In addition, check out this link for a selection of his poetry, including one of my favorites, “I Have Found What You Are Like”:

i have found what you are like
the rain,

       (Who feathers frightened fields
with the superior dust-of-sleep. wields

easily th…

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Weekend Reading: Lunar Eclipse Edition

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Early Wednesday morning (6-7AM), there was a total lunar eclipse, an event where the whole of the moon turns a kind of reddish-orange. I was awake to see it, but despite my best efforts, it eluded me. According to Scientific American, the next full lunar eclipse won’t occur until the summer of 2015.

In addition, the New York Times reports, “Supreme Court Delivers Tacit Win to Gay Marriage.” The decision to not-decide will clear the way for gay marriage in several states, all of which had pote…

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Weekend Reading: Hello October Edition

Happy Friday, ProfHackers!

The Atlantic confirms what many us have known for some time now: “Online Relationships Are Real.” Also from The Atlantic is an interesting look at they way NYU philosopher Helen Nissbaum is shaping national policy on privacy.

It’s football season, which means different things for different campuses: tailgates, crowds, difficulty parking, empty libraries (my personal favorite!), but this year it also means something very different: concussions. Last weekend, the Univers…

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Weekend Reading: Pumpkin Spice Edition

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Autumn 2014 officially began this week. Less daylight and cooler temperatures are here (or on their way), and pumpkin spice is taking over: from Starbucks and beer to yogurt, bagels, PopTarts, and hummus (side note: yogurt?! PopTarts?!)–even Trident chewing gum. Alternately, you might consider using the Pumpkin Spice Latte as a way to explain Jean Baudrillard

For a brief moment (it was taken down in a matter of minutes), Forbes magazine published a column which demonstrated that rape culture is…

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A CFP on Executable Culture

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As a blog, we have always been interested in translating aspects of maker culture into higher ed. (For just a couple of examples, see Erin “On Building” or Anastasia on “Making Games in the Classroom with Scratch”.) Having said that, it is difficult to translate the products and process of making things into quantifiable academic publishing units.

Addressing this problem, Friend-of-ProfHacker Kathi Inman Berens points to a journal that’s calling for “executable” projects:

CALL FOR PAPERS: HYPE…

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Open Thread Wednesday: About Those Software Updates

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At some point at or after 1pm in their local time zone, iOS users will be able to download and install the latest version of the system software. (Well, most users, anyway.) And while I’m sure ProfHacker will cover the utility of different features in the coming weeks–and while Android users will comment, ‘meh–we’ve had that feature for years’–I wanted to focus on a different question today:

Are you a first-day updater? Why / why not? Do you have different approaches for devices you own persona…

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Weekend Reading: Frazzled New Semester Edition

10600430_10203382112931120_4665268041150610272_nWith the new semester comes inevitable busyness and exhaustion, so I’m going to keep this introduction brief, saying only that there is no common thread along which this week’s selections are strung.

  • Natalia Cecire’s “Everybody’s Authority” offers a necessary and nuanced analysis of how most readers’ transition from RSS readers to social media has also shifted the dynamics of “semi-public” academic writing online.

    Cohen’s suggestion—explicitly made in the context of RSS’s then-rising prom…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Trying Anything New in Your Teaching?

By now, most of us are at least a week — if not two or three — into the new academic year. If we’re experimenting with anything new in our courses, by this point we might have at least an initial sense of whether the change is having the effect we’d hoped.

So let’s hear from you: Are you doing anything new in your classes this term? If so, what, why, and how’s it working out thus far?

[CC-licensed photo by Flickr user Lokesh Dhakar]