Category Archives: Editorial

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Against Helplessness

Feeling helpless today? Me, too. As my wife put it, “I am struggling with my Americanness.”

That said, helpless won’t help; action will. Those of us who work and study in higher ed often think of our role as not only helping to make sense of the world but also helping to enact positive change. Ijeoma Oluo, editor-at-large of The Establishment proposes fourteen basic steps for educating yourself about police accountability and driving support for police reform. A bunch of ‘em require little more…

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The Power of Looking Closely

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At least in the US, it’s the start of a long holiday weekend, and elsewhere there are things like the Euros and Brexit to distract people from the internet, alas.

I wanted to share this video by Amy Herman on “Visual Intelligence,” based on her book Visual Intelligence: Sharpen Your Perception, Change Your Life, which in turn was based on a project she used to do at the Frick Collection while she was training medical students how to look at art. The reason I like it is that the single favorite …

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Open Thread Wednesday: Conference Season FOMO or JOMO

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Early January is definitely one of the peak conference seasons, as scholarly organizations such as the MLA, the AHA, the AAS, and others take advantage of the US winter break to convene large meetings.

But no matter how big the conference is, most people don’t go, whether from lack of money, lack of interest, competing priorities, traumas from previous conferences, or just a need to recharge between semesters. For those of us who aren’t attending a major conference this week, watching waves of…

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Open Review for Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

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The MLA is publishing a collection of keywords on Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, which features curated sections on a variety of topics related to digital teaching methods. (I am on the advisory board for this collection.)

One of the interesting aspects of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities is that the keywords are available for open peer review and public comment. This is being staged in batches, both as a sanity-preserving mechanism and to make sure eac…

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Weekend Reading: Let’s Just Go to Mars Instead

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Another awful day in higher education, so I will just point to the blog of Ryan Martin, an anger researcher who once had to a teach a class with police officers stationed outside his class:

When class was over, I went back to my office (still aware of the fact that I wasn’t really any safer now that class was over) and all I could think about was what a ridiculous world we had created. How is it that we live in a world where students who want to learn and teachers who want to teach have to do…

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Weekend Reading: Almost Back Edition

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Mid-late August is an odd time in the higher ed calendar, as some schools have already started their semesters, while at other places, people are either clinging to the last two weeks of summer or franticly working to finish things before everything begins again. Whichever applies to you, I hope that your weekend is a great one, and that it contains absolutely no beet salad. (Unless it turns out to be delicious? But that seems like a stretch, right?)

  • It turns out we don’t just choose bad pass…
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Weekend Reading: July 31 Edition

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Happy end of the month, ProfHackers! When you you are enjoying a bit of relaxation or riding the productivity wave, we hope that you’ve had a great July. Here are a few links to give you something to think about or talk about (or both) over the weekend.

From Gamergate to Cecil the Lion, Internet mob justice is out of control.” And here’s Roxane Gay “Of Lions and Men: Mourning Samuel DuBose and Cecil the Lion

Food for thought: “The Dorito Effect: Healthy food is blander than ever and it’s maki…