All posts by Prof. Hacker

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Editorial is a Powerful, Flexible iOS App for Text Editing

[This is a guest post by Jason A. Heppler, the Academic Technology Specialist in the Department of History at Stanford University and a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Jason tweets at @jaheppler.]

There are a great many text editors on iOS, the operating system for iPhone and iPad. Just one glance at Brett Terpstra’s list of markdown editors can attest to the range of offerings available on the platform.

Editorial — available in the iOS app store — stands above the rest.

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Use Copy for Cloud Storage Backup and File Sharing

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[Jason A. Heppler is the Academic Technology Specialist in the Department of History at Stanford University and a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He tweets at @jaheppler.]

Recent announcements are showing a trend in cheaper storage solutions and cloud backups. Google recently updated its pricing for Drive storage and now offers 15 GB for free and incredibly cheap prices for 100 GB, 1 TB, and 10TB+. At WWDC, Apple announced changes to its iCloud service towards …

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Select and Click: PopClip Makes Text Manipulation Easy on the Mac

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[This is a guest post by Jim Cracraft, a Language Teaching Specialist and technology coordinator at Vanderbilt University's English Language Center (ELC), which offers English language support to individuals who have a first language other than English. He can be reached through the center's website: http://vanderbilt.edu/elc/ --@JBJ]

As a longtime Mac user who does not own an iOS device, I have been somewhat reluctant to embrace the steady “iOS-ification” of the Mac–you know, the aesthetic and…

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Using Video Annotation Tools to Teach Film Analysis

[This is a guest post by Chuck Tryon, an Associate Professor of English at Fayetteville State University. He is the author of On-Demand Culture: Digital Delivery and the Future of Movies. He tweets under the handle @chutry.]

One of the biggest challenges I’ve faced in teaching undergraduate film courses is developing students’ close reading skills. This can include not only teaching the formal aspects of film—lighting, cinematography, sound, editing, and other techniques—but also aspects…

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Open Thread Wednesday!

Each Wednesday, ProfHacker hosts an open thread discussion. Sometimes a specific topic is announced, and sometimes the discussion is completely open. Please remember to abide by our commenting and community guidelines. Thanks!

Hey, it’s Wednesday! I think you know what that means. It’s time for an open thread!

What’s on your mind? Do you need advice or feedback about something related to life and work in higher ed? Do you have advice or feedback to share about something related to life and work…

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Five Lessons for Online Teaching from Finishing a MOOC

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[This is a guest post by Michelle Moravec, a historian currently working on the politics of women's culture, which you can read about at michellemoravec.com. Follow her on Twitter at @professmoravec.--@JBJ]

At the end of January 2014, I enrolled in an MOOC on corpus linguistics offered by the U.K.-based Open University’s Future Learn. CorpusMOOC, as it was affectionately known and hashtagged on Twitter, was billed as a “practical introduction to the methodology of corpus linguistics for resea…

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Researching the Recent Past Online

statues at internet archive[This is a guest post by Dan Royles, a lecturer at the University of Angers in western France, where he teaches American Studies and English as a foreign language. He's previously written on "Digital Workflows for the Archives" for ProfHacker. You can find him online at danroyles.com, or follow him on Twitter at @danroyles.--@JBJ]

When I was writing my dissertation on African American AIDS activism, I ran into the problem that plagues many historians of the recent past: lack of archival sources….

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Tales of an Indiscriminate Tool Adopter

Down the Rabbit Hole

[This is a guest post by Michelle Moravec, a historian currently working on the politics of women's culture, which you can read about at michellemoravec.com. Follow her on Twitter at @professmoravec.--@JBJ]

I think I need to write How not to be a tool about your tool: tales of an indiscriminate tool adopter #digitalhumanities #dhist

— M.M. (@ProfessMoravec) January 14, 2014

If you participate in social media and do digital humanities work, this situation may sound familiar. Trawling through Twi…

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Open Thread: Dealing With Inclement Weather


As the Weather Channel reports, a winter storm is currently blanketing much of the East Coast of the United States with snow. Such weather conditions not only make it difficult for students, staff, and faculty to drive on the perhaps poorly-cleared streets and highways; they can also make it dangerous to walk on potentially icy campus sidewalks and stairways. Deciding whether to close campus — or to delay opening, or to close early — involves more than just an assessment of the safety of the ro…

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Heating Up History at the AHA

[This is a guest post by Jennifer Guiliano, Assistant Director for the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities and Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Maryland, where she teaches digital history. You can find her online at jguiliano.com, or follow her on twitter at @jenguiliano.]

With much of the US under a deep freeze, those following the hashtag #AHA2014 this past weekend might have noted things getting a bit heated. The American Historical Associati…