All posts by Jason B. Jones

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Weekend Reading: Summer Camp Edition

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What with all the news from Wisconsin and North Carolina and, let’s face it, the whole world of public higher education, it can seem legitimately overwhelming/despairing. One concrete thing to do would be to improve one’s faculty activism skills, and the best place to do that is the AAUP’s Summer Institute. It’s a three-day boot-camp in organizing one’s colleagues, talking to the media, pressuring senior administrators, and much else. It’s also a good way to keep up with news about the legal co…

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A Bill of Rights for Student Collaborators

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One exciting aspect of digital humanities work is its openness to collaboration, including collaboration with students. As someone who used to coordinate an undergraduate research program, I’ve always been particularly excited about opportunities to involve students in meaningful research–and participating actively in an ongoing research project certainly counts!

But undergraduate participation in research also raises a whole host of thorny questions–around compensation, around acknowledgment, …

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Schedule Meetings Anywhere with Meet

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In May, Amy wrote suggested Sunrise as an interesting cross-platform calendar option, right before it was bought by Microsoft. I don’t use Sunrise myself (Fantastical for life), but their most recent version does have a feature that led me to install it: The ability to send invitations via any iOS or Android app that accepts text input.

This happens via a 3rd-party keyboard, which is called Meet. (This is ever-so-slightly confusing, as Meet is part of the Sunrise app, not a separate installat…

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Weekend Reading: The End Is Near

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The splashy news here at the tail end of the week is edX & ASU’s announcement that they are going to offer a first year of college. Not for free, or even for “as inexpensively as many community colleges,” but since it’s pass, *then* pay, there’s still a somewhat innovative approach to the business model. Jonathan Rees has described the offering of MOOCs for credit as “weaponized” education technology,” and I’m not sure he’…

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Procrastination, Our Old Frenemy

A few years back, Natalie observed that “an expectation of procrastination seems almost built into the campus landscape,” an observation which hasn’t lost its accuracy since then. Heck, a non-trivial amount of modern internet and app culture often seems on a dialectic of enabling, and then overcoming, procrastination.

Two weeks ago, Shawn Blanc wrote a splendid essay describing procrastination as, fundamentally, an offense against personal integrity–against, that is, one’s commitments to onesel…

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Google Earth Pro Is Now Free

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Who doesn’t love Google Earth? The basic version has done a lot to lower the barriers to entry to basic ways of visualizing spatial data. Prior ProfHacker posts on Google Earth include Konrad’s explanation of how to add an image to Earth to look at historical changes, and Erin Sells’s assignment for mapping novels.

In case you missed it, on Friday Google announced that they have reduced the price of their professional-grade version, Google Earth Pro, from USD$399/year to free. Google Earth Pro …

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Outlook for iOS and Android: An Email App Administrators and Staff Will (Really!) Love

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Yesterday, Microsoft released Outlook for iOS and Android. This is a real email/calendaring app, not a warmed-over frontend for Office365 or Outlook.com: it supports Exchange Server, Exchange Online, Outlook.com, Gmail, iCloud, and Yahoo! Mail. (Well, real-ish, anyway.) It features all the latest features from apps like Inbox or Maibox: it has a “Focused Inbox,” for emails it thinks you’ll actually interact with, and an “Others” one, for that very important update from X. It also has all the cu…

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A History of the MLA Job List

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Jonathan Goodwin was going to give a talk at last weekend’s Modern Language Association convention on “Jobs of the MLA,” a look at the history of the MLA’s Job Information List. Unfortunately, he got sick and was unable to travel; happily, he was able to post the talk online. The MLA gave him almost 50 years of page-scans of the JIL, which were then OCRed for ease of searching. As he read the ads to plan how to make a database of them, he began tweeting s…

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Weekend Reading: Allllllmost Done Edition

So much youth soccer this weekend!

As I understand it, virtually every faculty member in the US is currently grading their fingers off right now, or procrastinating by prepping for midwinter conferences. (Except for those on sabbatical during the fall . . . they might well be quietly weeping at what remains to be done in the time remaining of their leave!) So I won’t prattle on in this space, but will simply wish everyone very well indeed, and the strength to get through whatever challenges you’re facing right now.

  • During the …
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Open Thread Wednesday: Favorite Higher Ed YouTube Channels?

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Today I am/will be in New York at something called a YouTube Educator Lab, in order in part to learn more about building out YouTube channels for my college.

But that led me to realize that I don’t think I subscribe to any explicitly higher-ed related YouTube channels myself. There are a couple of topic-specific ones I follow, but otherwise I rely on search.

So, if I could draw on the experience of ProfHacker readers: Do you subscribe to any YouTube channels about higher ed-related topics? Whic…