All posts by Anastasia Salter

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Starter Exercises for Interactive Storytelling


When we think about bringing interactive fiction into the classroom we often focus on the technology. I’ve written here about using accessible tools such as Twine, Twine 2.0, Inform 7, and Inklewriter to create everything from games to interactive essays and digital humanities projects. Bringing in software of this type can be a great way to transform an assignment and add procedural literacy outcomes to a range of disciplines. However, before we get into the technology, we need an idea. Here …

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Open Thread Wednesday: Summer Travel Abroad

I’ve been very fortunate this summer to spend a lot of time traveling, both for conferences and research.

Here are a few of the things I’ve changed now that I’m more accustomed to international travel:

  • Buy a data plan. I wrote a couple of years ago about the challenges of traveling abroad without a data plan. While some countries are fantastic for WiFi access, many locations worth visiting simply require the investment of a data plan for peace of mind and, more importantly, navigation. Many of…
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Re-evaluating the Risks of Public Scholarship


Last week I attended the HASTAC Conference, an interdisciplinary conference from the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (one of the oldest and most active academic social networks around). HASTAC is dedicated to public scholarship: many of its initiatives are based around blogging and sharing ideas through the social network, and the conference included livestreaming many sessions for a virtual conference, with a very active Twitter feed supported by designated…

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Weekend Reading: End of May Edition


As May draws to a close and many of us are settling into summer routines, it’s a great time to take stock of the state of the profession and think about what challenges we can prepare for in the coming school year. This week’s articles take a look at some ongoing debates in the profession.

With many of us at ProfHacker advocating or practicing some level of public scholarship, it can be valuable to learn from the experience of academic “celebrity.” Claire Potter reflects on her experiences buil…

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One Bag Academic Travel


Summer often brings an increase in both personal and academic travel, as the shift from a regular class schedule often lends time for study abroad, extended conferences and workshops, and other events. I have a lot of this type of travel going this summer, and sometimes I’m home for what feels like only a few hours before I need to repack my bag for the next event. With all of the extra fees for airline travel, there’s more incentive than ever to pack light for every trip, without paying checke…

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Making Accessible Games with Twine Audio

I’ve written about both Twine and Twine 2 as platforms that are very friendly to completely new developers and those who haven’t previously programmed, but Twine is also a platform that can offer accessibility from the user end. All text-based games build with well-structured HTML have a strong potential to be fairly easily manipulated through adaptive technologies, including screen readers. Whenever we’re thinking about integrating a new technology into teaching and learning, it’s important to…

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Tools for Transitions: Reflections on Year One

The first year is the hardest. This is a familiar warning, and one that I’ve personally found applies in many academic endeavors: college, graduate school, a new job, a new administrative role. This year was my first year at the University of Central Florida, a move that brought with it many transitions, including a new state, house, job, and program, not to mention new students and colleagues. Over the last year I’ve written about finding a home, preparing to move, leaving campus tech services

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Playful Browsing with Chrome Extensions

abstracthack

Ever since reading Natalie’s post on the Momentum Chrome extension, I’ve been paying more attention to the Chrome browser app marketplace. I was immediately converted to Momentum, as it’s built in to-do list tool and simple aesthetic make it a really easy way to stay on track. Chrome extensions fit in an odd space between app and websites: some of them simply offer things that could easily be found elsewhere on the web in a more convenient, integrated bookmark, while others include app-like fe…

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Making Mini Games with Twiny Jam


Twine is my favorite tool for working with would-be game designers new to interactive media: as I’ve noted in the past, both the original Twine and Twine 2.0 are newbie-friendly and flexible platforms for building hypertextual experiences. However, embarking on a Twine project can be daunting: the possibilities of building choice-driven narratives can lead down infinite paths. It can be tricky to build an assignment or workshop structure that keeps Twine texts down to scale without cutting off …

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Tools for Transitions: Starting the Tenure Process, Again

Last summer, I began a series of posts here on my transition from a tenure-track job I’d held for several years to a new state, a new university, and a new tenure process. I’m now most of the way through my first year, and it’s the season for preparing progress toward tenure reports. While this is process I’ve been through many times, it caught me by surprise here. It feels very weird to have just gone out to buy a new, empty black binder waiting for me to sort the files of the last eight-ish m…