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Games in the Classroom Reading List

 Last week on Twitter, I was asked for some recommendation for critical readings on games and learning. There are lots of enthusiasts for games in the classroom out there (myself included, of course) and tons of great places to start if you’re interested in learning more about bringing games into education. These are only the tip of the iceberg–there’s a particularly rich conversation in game studies surrounding serious and persuasive games, which is decidedly interwoven with educational games.

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Weekend Reading: Frazzled New Semester Edition

10600430_10203382112931120_4665268041150610272_nWith the new semester comes inevitable busyness and exhaustion, so I’m going to keep this introduction brief, saying only that there is no common thread along which this week’s selections are strung.

  • Natalia Cecire’s “Everybody’s Authority” offers a necessary and nuanced analysis of how most readers’ transition from RSS readers to social media has also shifted the dynamics of “semi-public” academic writing online.

    Cohen’s suggestion—explicitly made in the context of RSS’s then-rising prom…

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CFP: ‘Accessible Future’ Workshop in Lincoln, NE

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Here at ProfHacker, we’ve published a number of things over the years about accessibility in digital environments. And regular readers will remember that last September we announced the first Accessible Future workshop, which took place in Boston last semester. After Boston, we led a workshop in Austin, Texas.

Now we’re accepting applications for our third workshop, which will be held on November 14 and 15, 2014 in Lincoln, Nebraska. If you are interested in digital environments and accessibili…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Trying Anything New in Your Teaching?

By now, most of us are at least a week — if not two or three — into the new academic year. If we’re experimenting with anything new in our courses, by this point we might have at least an initial sense of whether the change is having the effect we’d hoped.

So let’s hear from you: Are you doing anything new in your classes this term? If so, what, why, and how’s it working out thus far?

[CC-licensed photo by Flickr user Lokesh Dhakar]

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Commit to Your Calendar

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When you glance at your calendar for next week, what do you see? Is it mostly empty except for a couple of meetings on Thursday, but you know that you have classes to teach on Monday and Wednesday? Or maybe your calendar looks completely full, but you know that you won’t really get to half the tasks you’ve filled in the days with. Many of us either carry commitments in our heads that we have to think about when scheduling other events, or we have to sort through the mixed list of appointments a…

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What Twitter Changes Might Mean for Academics


If you’re a regular user of Twitter, as many of us at ProfHacker are, you’ve no doubt seen the many posts speculating on Twitter’s impeding demise. Twitter, along with every other social network, gets declared dead on a regular basis. However, earlier this year Adrienne LaFrance and Robinson Meyer wrote “A Eulogy for Twitter” in the Atlantic and observed:

“ Twitter’s earnings last quarter, after all, were an improvement on the period before, and it added 14 million new users for a total of 255 …

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Weekend Reading: September Already Edition

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Another Labor Day is behind us, and I saw the first few autumn leaves this week, incongruous amidst temperatures in the upper 80 degree range. we hope you’ve have a good week and look forward to an even better weekend.

This week, Yale launched a massive web-based platform called Photogrammer that allows users to search and access a collection of 170,000 Depression-era photographs. The actual collection is housed in the Library of Congress and contains work by several prominent photographers …

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Visualize Your Promotion Portfolio with Cmap

[This is a guest post by Janine Utell, who is an Associate Professor of English at Widener University in Pennsylvania. She teaches composition and 19th and 20th century British literature; she has also facilitated a number of on- and off-campus workshops on writing, critical thinking, and general education. Previously at ProfHacker, she’s written on “Practical Wisdom and Professional Life” and “How to Study Your Own Teaching (And Why You Might Want To).” You can follow Janine on Twitter: @jan…

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Playing In The Classroom With The Ivanhoe Game

[This is a guest post by Stephanie Kingsley. She holds a Master's in English literature from the University of Virginia, where she specialized in 19th-century American literature and textual studies. She was one of this year's Scholars' Lab's Praxis Fellows, and she plans to work in digital editing, publishing, and project management. For more information, visit http://stephanie-kingsley.github.io/. --Ed.]

This past April, the University of Virginia Scholars’ Lab‘s Praxis Fellows released their…

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Weekend Reading: Back in the Classroom Edition

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Today’s image is a tableau titled “Classroom with Three Figures” by Lavern Kelley, painted white pine, plywood, brass, and plastic, 1979, 1984–87. I originally had something else in mind for this space, but when I came across it in my Creative Commons searching, I couldn’t not use it.

TGIF ProfHackers! This was the first week (back?) for many of us, and we hope it went well for you. For those of you who start after Labor Day, savor these final hours of freedom.

Like many of you, my social media…