All posts by William Germano

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This. Is. Really. Important.

I know I’m not the only one who’s noticing display text—advertising, announcements, and the like—angling for the reader’s attention by placing a period after each word. So that you have to read it slowly. And feel the importance. Of every word. Of. Every. Word.

This is, I hope, a momentary infatuation with the beleaguered full stop, which typographers and art directors are enlisting to add emphasis to anything, provided the anything is brief, and preferably composed of words not in excess of two…

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Left Sharking

You’ve got to feel sorry for the Right Shark, who unlike the Right Whale, really was on the right, and in the right, too.

As readers of Lingua Franca know, the fabulously expensive entertainment known as the Super Bowl consists of two frequently interrupted episodes of male violence that sandwich the thing many viewers turn in for. I mean, of course, the Halftime Show.

More than one hundred million people watched Super Bowl XLIX, which is apparently played in Latin.

For some of those viewers, …

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Rain Event, Snow Event

LF-8458547874_12fdf2f32e_kWhy have weather when you could have an event?

It sounds like ad copy for some divine meteorological service.

Recently a Chronicle editor posed the question, “When did the usages rain event  and snow event become popular?” To which I would add, “And why did we need these terms at all?”

First, the history. The Google NGram for rain event and snow event shows that the weather gets fancy sometime in the mid 1970s. That’s when the course of rain event starts making its jagged rise, and looking rath…

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Words for Beginners

Ex. 1:  torture. 

Today, class, we will look at a word that is not complicated. Our friends at the Oxford English Dictionary help us get started:

1.a.  The infliction of severe bodily pain, as punishment or a means of persuasion.

Wait, some part of that wasn’t clear? Then let’s follow the OED on to the second, more fully elaborated explanation.

2.a. Severe or excruciating pain or suffering (of body or mind); anguish, agony, torment; the infliction of such.

Not clear yet? Here is a third definiti…

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Ain’t It Awful?

Recently I was at a dinner party where people were using the words awful  and awesome, possibly as antonyms. Awful  was, I thought, used to describe something very bad, awesome something very good.

The words awesome and awful have been doing do-si-do with one another for a while. So are they the same word? And if so, what word is that, exactly?

The Oxford English Dictionary records awful as medieval. Since the ninth century, it’s been the high-toned term of choice meaning “awe-inspiring,” in…

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Turkey Talk

Nobody can explain the turkey.

The expression to talk turkey has been with us for a long time. We’re still not sure where it comes from, though, much less how turkeys got involved. You’d think turkeys had enough to worry about besides English usage. Especially this time of year.

Turkeys mean American Thanksgiving (a retronym, like acoustic guitar—thank you, my many Canadian friends). Which of course is why I’ve turned to British reference works for an explanation as to the meaning of the exp…

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Pediaphilia

Narcissus2

Caravaggio’s “Narcissus.” The encyclopedia made us look outward.

No, it’s not what you think. It’s the creeping insistence that everything needs its own encyclopedia.

Older readers of Lingua Franca will remember the era of multivolume encyclopedias. Some of you may have grown up with classy sets of Britannicas. Others may have had their parents acquire a humbler set of Funk & Wagnalls, one volume at a time, at the grocery store, as mine did. The books were offered week by week, letter by letter,…

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Czars in Their Eyes

Boris Godunov, czar of all Russia, 1598-1605

It’s been a big month for the czars.

The White House has appointed Ron Klain as Ebola czar. Not capo or boss, but czar, the Russian term (also transliterated as tsar) related to Latin Caesar and German Kaiser.

What’s with American English and czar, concept and word? Is it ours now, or do we still need to mark it off in some way?

HuffPo and The Washington Times deploy the term in roman font without typographic qualification. NPR has taken a more circu…

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The Intentional Fallacy

A fellow educator has brought to my attention the rise of intentional as a signifying term in academic life. If you haven’t noticed it yet, you will.

Intentional is a word with at least two categories of meaning.

The first sense of intentional may be found in the concept of intentional community.  Those who are part of a convent, a kibbutz, a commune— apparently things that begin with a k sound—might all be described as members of intentional communities.

I don’t love the phrase, but I get the…

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Dudgeons and Dragons

High dudgeon. No it’s not a charming village outside of Oxford, but it’s a place all right, and it’s where a lot of us academic types live.

The Google NGram Viewer would suggest that dudgeon, meaning something like a fit of temper, enjoyed its heyday in the century or before World War II, a point at which, perhaps, the scale and language for anger and outrage was recalibrated.

Dudgeon is a lovely word, not to be confused with gudgeon, about which more in a moment.

The OED’s first definition for