Tag Archives: assessment

May 24, 2011, 12:11 pm

ORGANIZING A DESIGN CHARRETTE: gathering a visual response for learning spaces (a packet)

We’re gearing up for a sizeable renovation and I’ve been trying to include students and faculty in on the interior design discussion. I’m planning a full post on the campaign later this summer—most likely after ALA—but in the meantime, I wanted to share this with others working on similar projects.

I’m a big fan of the design charrette activity. Having used it before, I definitely wanted to include it in my current efforts. It’s easy to conduct and students always seem to enjoy it as an outlet for creative expression. It’s also helpful to gather a visual response when talking about learning spaces.

This time around I wanted to conduct the charrette in a very public setting. I wanted everyone who entered the library to see it happening and to have the opportunity to participate—or at the very least to take s look at the renderings and other information that was…

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September 30, 2010, 7:28 am

Applied Diplomacy: an assessment attempt to discover what people know, don’t know, and want to know

I’m experimenting with an assessment tactic. I have a pile of multicolored sticky notes in my office related to another project AND I was preparing for a meeting with our User Services Group to talk broadly & briefly about the topic of assessment AND I was reading Visual Meetings–  so basically I was looking for a way to blend all those components.

 

A theme that I keep coming back to is do we know our users? We can read about them and obviously we interact with them daily, but do we really know them? Do we really know the process that grad students experience as they prep for candidacy?  Do we really know what happens in the dorms the night before a big assignment is due? Do we really know faculty tendencies when starting a new article or when they prep to teach a brand new course?

 

I tend to be overly curiously, but what about my colleagues? What I realized is that I didn’t know …

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