December 17, 2013, 7:09 pm

Welcoming Students… On The Day They Are Accepted?

I’ve always been interested in reaching out to students as soon as possible. Conceptually I like that space in the summer – the metamorphosis from high school senior to college freshmen. It feels like a prime time to engage and cultivate a positive relationship.

I use to consider the traditional route. Devise a fun print piece and have that item included in a welcome packet or other mailing. Of course incoming students receive a barrage of info and you’d really have to standout. They also have immediate (deadline-driven) needs like financial aid, housing, course selection, meal plans, and football tickets.

Facebook groups are another possibility to start the conversation. I wrote about making a good impression on incoming freshmen several years ago. Students form groups (i.e. Class of 2014) and interact with each other on social and academic matters. I’ve engaged with…

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December 10, 2013, 7:48 pm

Confess Your Stress: selfies as therapy

Like many libraries, we do a lot of things for students during finals. We give away food. We bring in therapy dogs and cats. We add extra tables and chairs. We’ve done mindfulness (and related) programs. We’ve done games and gaming. We’ve done bubble wrap. Our folks are always looking for new ways to help students during this challenging time.

My new favorite thing: Stress Confessional Photo Booth.

stress_boothbooth_sideVirginia Tech has a portable photo booth that pops up at different campus locations; it’s a great value-add for events. Pretty straight forward — students snap their photos and print them out for free.

We’ve hosted the booth in the library before and it always gets a good reaction. This time we added a creative thematic element: stress confessional. The idea incubated via a Fast Company article How Selfies Are Re-Energizing The New York Public Library and we mashed that…

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December 3, 2013, 5:33 pm

What If I Paid You To Study In The Library?

teamwork2If I paid you to study in the library you would likely take me up on the offer. And if I paid you and your group to study there together, then you would definitely use the library more often.

That’s the gist of a recent economics study: Letting Down the Team? Social Effects of Team Incentives

This research was conducted while I was at UCSB. I gave the faculty access to a large group study space (50+ chairs) in order to conduct their experiment. They tested incentive reactions in two environments: a library and a gym.

They found that while individuals took advantage of the pay to study here opportunity, incentives tied to team performance resulted in strikingly greater participation:

“People in two real-world settings raising their effort level because a teammate’s payoff is at stake. Findings indicate that the magnitude of this effect can be considerably larger than that …

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November 21, 2013, 3:29 pm

A MONITOR ON EVERY TABLE? Rising student expectations

The aspiration was once a power outlet for every table– but the stakes are rising. Are we entering an era where students need (and expect) a monitor on every table?

monitors

Virginia Tech students bring their own monitor to the library for collaboration.

Earlier this week I heard about a group of students who brought their own monitor into the library. They were coding together and required a shared display to collaborative effectively. We do provide group monitors, but they are always in high demand… so they used their own.

While I appreciate the ingenuity of this group to improvise on a solution, I also feel like I let them down. As soon as some funding opens up in January I’m going to purchase a handful of monitors and have them installed at group tables. This has been in our renovation documents for a while…

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November 17, 2013, 5:42 pm

Who is your Masood Ashraf Raja? U of North Texas & Advocacy or: Library as cause, not just collections

UNT’s Willis Library

You’ve probably heard the news by now about the University of North Texas Library’s $1.7 million shortfall. Many operations are on hiatus while they figure out the funding possibilities. Apparently library administrators were caught off guard and are required to retroactively absorb benefits and other expenses. Their budget is almost entirely derived from student fees – which they cannot raise—and they will likely need to cut back on services and collections.

UNT provides us with a wakeup call and a great opportunity for scenario planning. How would you (or your organization) react if your Provost placed you in a similar situation? These are conversations we had all the time when I was the University of California, but if you’re not ready it can be quite a shock.

save_UNTTo me the most interesting…

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November 15, 2013, 7:31 pm

Further Thoughts on GLASS

I just gave a campus interview about our GLASS project. Here is the gist of my answers in long form.

glass_interview

Giving a campus interview. I’ll link out once the video is online.

I’m really excited to be involved with GLASS. It’s an interesting technology and wearable computing seems to be one of the next big things.

I love what Virginia Tech is doing by building a cohort of faculty who are using GLASS in different ways and representing different disciplines. Arts, sciences, building construction, public policy, it’s a wide mix.

And it is exciting for me to represent the library in that effort because I get to work hand in hand with faculty on rethinking their teaching and research practices. We want to build new apps together, new software together, new pedagogies, new capabilities. So it is valuable for me …

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November 13, 2013, 9:29 pm

Slayer & benchmarking of library collections

A friend of mine once remarked that Jack Kerouac judged diners solely on the quality of their apple pie. Apparently you can infer a lot about an establishment based upon the size, presentation, and taste of this classic dessert.

When it comes to libraries and bookstores I’ve always used a similar measuring device: Hermann Hesse. Most libraries have the classics (Steppenwolf, Siddhartha) but what really impresses me is seeing lesser-known (and in my opinion better) novels like Beneath the Wheel and Demian. And the pinnacle for me is Narcissus and Goldmund. To me this is his masterpiece.

As superficial as it sounds, I use to think that I could tell a lot about a library’s collection based upon these works. I liked to think that it revealed something about the library’s intellectual curiosity and that it suggested something about what else might be found in the stacks. I guess…

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October 31, 2013, 1:54 pm

The Gorilla Statement (A Halloween Post)

I didn’t attend ALA this summer but I wish I had—just to meet the gorilla. It’s the one thing that stood out as I followed the conference on Twitter:

conferencesuit

photo 1 photo 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My initial reaction was that he must have been making a statement: the gorilla in the room / elephant in the room type of thing. This had to be a commentary on obsolescence. Or maybe it was some type of wakeup call: a future shock –  “too much change in too short of a time.” Or maybe he was trying to shake people from the routine patterns of librarian presentations. Or was it a play on the invisible gorilla theme and he was making a point about us not being able to see things that are in plain sight?

 

Obviously I’ve probably overthought the whole thing. When I looked at the photos without any context, I saw the alienation of an outsider: a person with bold ideas who…

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October 28, 2013, 3:36 pm

FLIP THE MODEL: Strategies for Creating and Delivering Value (a pre-print)

I’ve been eager to share this one. It was wrapped up in August and I’ve been sitting on it since the semester started. I recently got the “OK” from Elsevier and just put the final visuals together this weekend. There are a number of interesting stories in here– I’ll leave it at that:

flip_icon“Academic libraries are encountering a critical inflection point. In our case it isn’t a single technology that is disrupting our established system, but a barrage of advancements in publishing, pedagogy, and user preferences. The landscape is shifting around us, and the future of scholarship requires us to develop new skills, design new environments, and deliver new service capacities. In short, we need new operating models.” Read the pre-print.

This is the draft version that I submitted to the editors. The final (authoritative) copy will be out in January 2014 in the Journal of Academic…

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October 10, 2013, 2:50 pm

Libraries and GLASS: 7 things to think about as wearable computing emerges

glass_officeI joined the Google Glass community last week. A Glass Explorer at Virginia Tech invited me in and it has been an interesting experience so far. We are forming a cohort of Glass Explorers on our campus. This is an effort to apply the technology to both teaching and research situations.

Together the four of us will be exploring new practices and we also want to develop applications that could benefit higher ed. I’m glad that the library was invited in the mix; it’s interesting to observe the way faculty think and to contribute to the venture.

I’ll post more about our progress in the coming months but today I wanted to share a few quick observations about Glass and libraries:

1. QR codes mean something now
I’ve never liked QR codes. They’ve always felt desperate to me. It is very awkward to hold up a phone or tablet and to click an app or button. Glass changes that and …

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