Category Archives: women

April 12, 2013, 9:10 am

Labour MP Glenda Jackson Leans In On Margaret Thatcher

In the midst of the gauzy tributes to Margaret Thatcher, Glenda Jackson kicks it in the House of Commons. Imagine if any United States politician had possessed the onions to deliver a similar summary of Ronald Reagan’s political and social legacy. Hat tip.

April 8, 2013, 9:53 am

What A World Without Women’s Studies Looked Like

Sexist

Before women’s studies, these signs were invisible.

Mariam Chamberlain, one of the founding mothers of women’s studies, died last week at the age of 94.  A Ph.D. in economics, as a program officer at the Ford Foundation she disbursed around $5 million in grants to identify key areas for curricular change, as well to establish research on women through institutes like the Center for Women Policy Studies.

It’s easy to forget how important women’s studies was to reshaping what knowledge looked like. In part this is because there are fewer and fewer of us who remember what universities that were almost entirely run by and for men looked like. But the success of women’s studies has led to its transformation — into feminist studies, gender studies, queer studies — and to inevitable (as well as important)…

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March 3, 2013, 8:55 pm

We Don’t Need Another Hero: One Woman’s Disabled History

2235_regHarilyn Rousso, Don’t Call Me Inspirational: A Disabled Feminist Talks Back (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2013), 224 pp., paper $24.95.

From its title onward, New York activist Harilyn Rousso’s Don’t Call Me Inspirational: A Disabled Feminist Talks Back argues against the American romance with parables about everyday heroism and triumph over adversity. Instead, this book asks: what would a public that is welcoming to disabled people actually look like? An American Studies Association panel I attended last fall, riffing off of Dan Savage’s It Gets Better YouTube campaign for GLBT youth, put it this way: what if “it” doesn’t get better? What if there is no cure, no triumphant overcoming? What if the body you have is the body you get? Can we imagine instead narratives about rich and full lives with disability?

These are crucial questions, and it is is why you …

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April 13, 2012, 4:26 pm

What Kind of Times are These?

Anonymous, Adrienne Rich (c. 1975), courtesy of the Library of Congress [LC-USZ62-103575

Today’s guest blogger, Jennifer Finney Boylan, is professor of English at Colby College. She is the author of 13 books, including Stuck in the Middle With You: Parenthood in Three Genders, which will be published by Random House/Crown in 2013, along with the revised 10th-year anniversary edition of her memoir, She’s Not There. Boylan’s blog, There from Here is at www.jenniferboylan.net, and she may be reached at jb@jenniferboylan.net.

 

Last week, as prelude to an evening of poetry, my colleague Peter Harris– a writer and a professor here at Colby College–gave a short reading from Adrienne Rich’s “What Kind of Times Are These.” “She burned through the fog that I lived in like an acetylene torch,” he…

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May 29, 2011, 5:23 pm

Celebrating The Greatest Generation (Of Women)

In case you didn’t know it, today is Rosie the Riveter’s 68th birthday.  Berkeley Ph.D. candidate Samuel Redman is celebrating on The Berkeley Blog with a piece just published today,  “Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter and World War II in American Memory.” Okay, Rosie’s probably a bit older than 68, but why would you ask a girl her real age?

Redman’s piece documents Rosie’s national debut on May 29 1943 on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post with a feature announcing her contributions to the war effort.  Look at the muscles on that gal!  She needs them to control that phallic rivet gun that she used to knock out one prefabricated ship after another.  According to About.com‘s Kennedy Hickman, “US shipyards would produce 2,751 Liberty Ships. The majority (1,552) of these came from new yards built on the West Coast and operated by Henry J. Kaiser.”

Operating four yards in Richmond, CA…

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September 26, 2010, 2:42 am

Where Women Gather, Trouble Follows: Letting Off Steam At The University Of Toledo

When you were flying over Ohio last week, did you see a big cloud over Toledo?  That was a bunch of steamed up faculty!  The Toledo Blade reports a wholesale restructuring of the University of Toledo that has comrades at that school in a state of distress.  According to Blade reporter Christopher Kirkpatrick,”President Lloyd Jacobs plans to break up the century-old College of Arts and Sciences and create three new colleges in its place.”  These colleges will be “discipline-driven,” and the humanities and social sciences have been promised an equal seat at the table with the professional schools and the sciences. Humanities and social science faculty are skeptical of this, and everything else about their future in the new university.  Jacobs was hired in 2006, promising the board of trustees that he would “create a UT academic experience more relevant to everyday life, and to ultimately…

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