Category Archives: the Job Market

March 18, 2014, 12:19 pm

Random Bullets of Academia: Tuesday Edition

jackofalltradesHistorians – are you sick of  adjuncting? Consider the highly-paid world of finance! In Perspectives on History, Chris McNickle talks about putting his history Ph.D. to use as the global head of institutional business for Fidelity Worldwide Investment. As it turns out, the savvy investor wants to know what things change over time; why bad things happen; and what might happen in the future. Doing this properly all requires research, evidence and argument, not to mention an understanding of the conditions under which the economy has flourished and crashed in the past.

I am really starting to like this monthly feature. It leads by example, and demonstrates a reform that all graduate programs might make without hiring another faculty member or making a single curricular change: just put on your department web page what your non-academic degree holders are doing.

(Adjuncting, by the…

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December 23, 2013, 12:19 pm

Job Market Rage Redux

Caution-Drama-Queen-Just-AheadThis gem is making the rounds of the interwebs: UC-Riverside’s English department plans to let semi-finalists for its job in American Literature know five days in advance if they are to be interviewed at the Modern Language Association meeting. Rebecca Schuman, a writer for Slate and The Chronicle of Higher Education has outed them on her blog, pan kisses kafka. After years of winning prizes, Schuman went through four job seasons without being offered a job. She quit to become an education journalist. “These days,” she writes in her profile, “I can’t believe I ever wanted to be a full-time professor, given how much more fun it is to be able to say whatever the fuck I want to and get paid for it.”

I can’t believe that she isn’t a little more cautious about attacking people in public without getting their side of the story, given that she is a professional journalist. And yes, it…

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September 8, 2013, 11:18 am

Your Weekly Radical Reader: Shorts From Around The Web

-Rafael-Nadal-of-Spain-pulls-his-shorts-rafael-nadal-31103796-1024-1537

My current favorite shorts are being worn by Rafa out in Queens.

There’s a lot sitting on our desk at Tenured Radical, each item of which deserves its own post.  But since we will be away much of the week doing research at Cornell and hanging with the History Department (Thursday, September 12, Guerlac Room in the Andrew White House, at 4:30), there may not be much attention to bloggy biz. So, without further ado, our news shorts include:

The University Without Students!  If you read this week’s New Yorker puff piece on John Sexton, the president of New York University, you will realize that the future is now. The role of universities is to provide real estate for executives and law school faculty, conduct high-level negotiations with dictatorships, and move as many students abroad as possible where they can …

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November 4, 2012, 10:26 am

To Market, To Market: The Job Fairy Helps You Land Your Next Job

Clap your hands if you believe in associate professors! Photo credit.

Is going on the job market as a tenured person a loser’s game?

Today’s crie du coeur  is from hist1969, an associate professor who is itchin’, as I was a couple years back, to put on the travelin’ shoes. I edited the question slightly to give more space for a response.

What do you know about the experiences of historians who returned to the market as tenured associate professors? I have looked around, but it seems that in my field people who are moving to other universities have been personally invited to apply. I have received some invitations to apply for positions in the last two years. However, the searches were canceled, or I ultimately felt that such invitations were only intended to “furnish” the searches. By now, I think it’s…

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November 27, 2011, 11:29 am

Even More Annals of the Great Depression: A Job Market Carnival

It’s the last day of Thanksgiving break, which means the job season (for what it is worth) is about to go into high gear. Longtime Readers of the Radical will recall that one of my early posting categories was the job market (tag lines also include “the job fairy,” “the job fairy is not smiling” and “the job fairy is smiling.”) When I began this blog, it is quite possible that I had served on and/or chaired more searches than almost anyone my age. (more…)

July 29, 2011, 1:16 pm

Tenured Folk: Is It Safe To Go Back On The Job Market?

Are you chum and the job market the Big White One?

In the case of the Tenured Radical, I think we can say:  most definitely yes.  After two years on the job market, I recently accepted an offer of a tenured faculty position at rank. While I have not yet entirely digested the experience, I have a few reflections on it in the event that you too are thinking about going on the market as a senior person.

I know, I know.  All of my advice is supposed to be for the nontenured or the jobless.  But senior people have dreams too, don’t they?  So after years of telling other people what to do, I put some of my own advice into practice.

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December 27, 2010, 5:37 pm

Tell Us About Your Dissertation: And Other Commonly Fumbled Interview Questions

Photo credit.

As has been frequently indicated over the four years of Tenured Radical‘s existence, Interviewing R Us. Why? Well, it is probably not too modest to say that over the years we have interviewed a great many people in hotel rooms, been interviewed by more than a few hiring committees ourselves, and have hung out in the bar afterward talking to other hiring committees about what they saw that day.  Over time, we have developed a perspective on what works and what doesn’t.  It isn’t the only perspective, but to paraphrase Monty Python, it is the perspective which is ours.

So for those of you lucky enough to have AHA or MLA interviews, here is our list of the most frequent fumbles and how to avoid them.

Know how to talk about your dissertation.  You nubies out there would be shocked to know how many of you blow it coming right out of the gate.  When you can’t talk intelligently…

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November 28, 2010, 11:16 pm

The Job Market Is A Lot Like The PBS NewsHour, And Other Advice For Skype Interviews

“Of course I can teach the second half of the U.S. History survey, Mr. DeMille ”

As I have suggested in earlier years, the day of the convention interview may be coming to an end.  It has been spitting blood and teeth for at least twenty years, as the academic job market has taken a pounding with only occasional, and unusual, seasons of activity that cause the professional association newsletters to write perky articles about recovery.

Even when I was a graduate student, a person could expect to pick up more than one interview at a conference.  Three interviews were considered a tipping point after which it was clear that something you were doing was ringing a bell and there would be a job with your name on it.  Even visiting jobs sometimes merited sending a small committee to the AHA:  the job that washed me in the holy water of the Ivy League and sent me catapulting into a real career…

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October 31, 2010, 3:21 pm

Trick Or Treat At Tenured Radical: What Will You Be Wearing?

Will you get candy — or a rock?  Illustration hat tip.

We at Tenured Radical, normally so generous to the constituencies for whom this holiday is the apex of the year (little children, gay folk, college students) detest Halloween.  We feel foolish when we dress up.  We think candy is too expensive.  Despite the fact that we are known to consume it, we also think candy is unhealthy.  We resent the vast federal subsidies that go to an already fiscally plump sugar and corn syrup industry at a time when ordinary Americans are losing their houses and the basic requirements for living a healthy life are so difficult for the poor to access.  In 2007, the Cato Institute estimated that sugar subsidies alone would cost taxpayers $1.4 billion over a decade; and that consumers of the numerous products containing sugar would pay a $1.7 billion annual surcharge because of these price supports.  Corn, …

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August 15, 2010, 3:01 pm

Never Mix, Never Worry: A Brief (And Incomplete) History Of The Academic Couple

Push your way past the Katie Roiphe essay on page 2 of the New York Times “Sunday Styles” section today (yes, this conservative anti-feminist really does seem to own the column named “Cultural Studies,” which is an irony, is it not, given what cultural studies represents on the academic left? Does Roiphe know this? One suspects not.) Make your way to “Modern Love,” where Boston College Shakespeare scholar Caroline Bicks, who also blogs at Academic Shakespeare, writes about academic commuting. In “Is The Husband Going To Be A Problem?” she addresses going on the job market as a couple, commonly known in academia as “the two body problem.” She also mentions what I think is probably a widespread experience: Bicks’ husband was never asked about what would happen to her on his interviews; but whether he would be a “hiring issue” was an anxious subtext of her interviews, a question that was …

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