Category Archives: Money

March 7, 2015, 11:20 am

How We Make Money From Books

Dollars in the books, isolated on white background, business traI recently had the good fortune and pleasure of signing, and returning, a new book contract. It is only the third one I have ever been offered, and I am happy to say that over time, these documents seem to be getting shorter, less complicated, and easier to understand. This one is about half the length of my first contract, signed about two decades ago; it also designates an advance that is about $500 lower than that first advance.

I want to tell you why that lower advance is OK, and why my negotiations with the press over the terms of this contract were very brief. To do that, I will tell you another story, one that is about how academics that have money made it. It is based on a snapshot I have just gotten of my own savings, a retirement fund that has more or less survived eight years of low wages in grad school; two years of adjunct labor; paying back student loans; having homes in…

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December 26, 2014, 2:46 pm

Ho-Ho-Ho: Giving It Away

flat,550x550,075,f.u1Every year, we at Tenured Radical give away money. Why? So the government can’t have it to build bombs and subsidize the sugar industry, of course! If you are itching to do good, here are some causes that caught our eye this year.

Planned Parenthood. This is an annual donation to which longtime readers of this blog are accustomed. Women’s health is vulnerable to federal budget cutting for the next two years in a way it hasn’t been for a long time, and a gift given before December 31st will be matched, up to $1 million. Did you know that Planned Parenthood dedicates itself to men’s sexual health as well — and is one of the leading health care providers for Latino men nationwide?

OutHistory.org. As a volunteer co-director for OutHistory.org with Jonathan Ned Katz (our founder) and John D’Emilio, I give my time. However, because we are free and take no advertising, we need money to…

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September 28, 2014, 1:55 pm

When Gerda Lerner Calls, Answer

UW-Madison_history_professor_Gerda_LernerBecause it’s always Women’s History Month here at Tenured Radical, I’m happy to announce that Why Women Need to Climb Mountains – A Journey of Discovery with Dr. Gerda Lerner, the documentary about this pioneering historian of women, is well on its way to completion.  But we need your help.

As Director Renata Keller and producer Kathy Bayer write,

We’re thrilled to have completed production on the first and only documentary about pioneering feminist historian Dr. Gerda Lerner. After 2 years of hard work, navigating financial and practical challenges, and unfortunately losing Gerda in the middle of filming, we’re very happy to have come this far.

We’ve received financial support from foundations in Austria and the US, as well as generous individuals worldwide – and we still need to raise $62,000 (48,000 euros) to edit and complete the film this winter. We hope to…

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September 21, 2014, 10:43 am

Becuz the Marketplace? Obama Administration Persists In Higher Ed Fumble

reality is overratedIn today’s New York Times, Susan Dynarski politely explains why the latest Obama administration plan to address the high cost of college without any public finding is a neoliberal farce. Because affording higher ed is all about having the information to make responsible choices! Once you know that, is there anything else the federal government could do?

Well, one strategy would be to not misrepresent the origins of the tuition problem: shrinking public dollars for higher education. Dynarski frames this about as clearly as an education writer could without saying outright that  covering up cost-shifting to students and their parents is a scandal of epic proportions, and the Obama administration is now complicit in that scandal by offering up a version of Consumer Reports and hoping that no one notices for at least two years that it is not a plan. It is not a policy either, except …

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January 4, 2014, 10:30 am

AHA Day 2: Fun With The Humanities

Elephant SittingYesterday morning I tweeted a terrific session sponsored by the NEH, hung out with a Colorado group clustered around blog pal Historiann, went to the business meeting of the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History, went to lunch with an old friend I met years ago at Nancy Cott’s Schlesinger Library Summer Camp, and then attended the CLGBTH evening reception. 

After the helper-skelter of the fall on the Internet Highway, the American Historical Association Annual Meeting is downright soothing. Lots of coffee, conversations, and evening drinks, dropping into great panels and spontaneous meetings with old friends are reminding me why a conference is fun. The big work on Day 2 was a panel on the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Report on the Humanities and Social Sciences, with Earl Lewis, Susan Griffin, Anthony Grafton, James Grossman, Estevan Rael-Galvez a…

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December 21, 2013, 4:01 pm

Give It Up: A Few Suggestions for Holiday Giving

Alfred_E_Neuman_as_Santa_by_ZigZag123Finished your holiday shopping? Sick of materialism and the constant prodding to buy more and more stuff? I get that way too sometimes. That’s when it’s time to ask yourself: Have I given away enough money this year? So we at Tenured Radical are going to take a short station break from debating the future of the American Studies Association to play my favorite holiday game:

Where Is Tenured Radical Giving Money This Year? (An Annotated List)

Queers for Economic Justice. This organization is, unfortunately, defunct, due to the fact that we, as a community,  didn’t give enough money before now — or maybe because so few people care about the projects promoting economic justice right outside their door. This New York based nonprofit was only twelve years old, and a shining light in a GLBT politics that has increasingly pushed racism class analysis to the margins of its concerns. QEJ…

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November 12, 2013, 12:22 pm

Making Your Scholarship Accessible — For A Price

97104665Paula Kaufman, most recently Dean of Libraries and University Librarian at University of Illinois U-C, reports on the mass resignation of the Journal of Library Administration (JLA) editorial board. (H/T) The issue? The publisher, Taylor & Francis, insisted on author agreements that, in some contributors’ view, restricted access to their work unfairly.

Most objectors read the agreement to give T&F exclusive rights to the author’s work. T&F said it didn’t, and although it wouldn’t alter its standard agreement, to its credit it accepted some amendments, including language that clarified the confusion. All seven authors whose work appears in the January 2013 issue used an addendum. Subsequently, however, two authors of articles that were to appear in future issues withdrew them prior to publication because they weren’t (more…)

December 1, 2011, 10:52 pm

Going Postal: A Few Random Thoughts At The End of Term

I was at the Zenith post office today, mailing a large box of books to a former advisee now in his first year of graduate school.  As usual, I had to wait in line.  Students, who have little access to ordinary household supplies, have a tendency to purchase a box at the post office for whatever they are sending and then pack the box right at the counter.  This means that when a personal appearance at the PO is called for, and you don’t feel like driving downtown, it is usually a good idea to bring something to read:  each customer ahead of you can take a while to finish up.  When I got to the front of the line, the Mistress of Post rang up my shipment at the Media Mail rate, and I held out my debit card. (more…)

November 13, 2011, 4:55 pm

On the Nature of Change in Higher Ed (Part II): Education and the New Economy

We return to guest blogger, historian and former Zenith provost Judith C. Brown.  Her full biography and Part I of this series can be viewed here.  Brown ended the first section of her essay by reflecting: “in the early 19th century, it was in the relative ‘backwater’ of the German universities as well as in the newer universities of Europe, where imagination and flexibility with regard to change were able to flourish, that we see the beginnings of the modern research university.”  She then asked: “Are we in that kind of turning point in American higher education?”  The answer is yes.

American higher education is at a major turning point. We are in the midst of enormous social, political, economic, and technological changes that are part of big long-term shifts in the economic and political position of the U.S. in the world, shifts that began several decades ago. While the U.S….

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December 18, 2010, 3:31 pm

Is There A Budget To Be Cut Under Your Christmas Tree? A View To The Future

In yesterday’s Huffpo, David J. Skorton, the president of Cornell University  asserted that “We Can Do Better On College Costs.”  He proposes calling a halt to the educational blame game:  “let’s stop the intellectual shoving matches,” he argues, “and get about the business of dealing with those factors that can and should be controlled to attenuate the rate of rise of both cost and price. And let’s also stop apologizing for investments that are necessary to keep higher education one of America’s premier ‘products.’” His suggestions include:

  1. greater specialization on individual campuses, so that institutions are not duplicating partially filled programs;
  2. reviews of “faculty productivity and quality,” including post-tenure reviews;
  3. acknowledging that educational administrators who are skilled at running an institution might not always have the skills to do so in a cost-efficient way.

    The…

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