Category Archives: books

January 31, 2014, 1:00 am

Random Pieces of Writing Fun

Flying_PigsHere’s a redirect to my book blog where, to celebrate completing another draft chapter, I describe my weird writing process.

You’ve heard the expression “when pigs fly?” Well, the little porkers are fluttering around the Mountain West: Historiann joined Twitter. We expect great things of you, cowgirl, as you are hands down the wittiest woman in the Rockies.

John Fea, who is awesome in so many ways, rented a hotel room and wrote over 30,000 words in a weekend. Over at the #GraftonLine, we are all, like, dude.

It is well known within the four walls of my home that I am Ann Patchett’s biggest fan. Her recent book, This is the Story of A Happy Marriage (Harpers, 2013), a collection of nonfiction essays, is particularly good reading if you are trying to focus on, and think about, your writing. Anyone wishing to make a speech in defense of the humanities will also love Patchett’s…

Read More

December 17, 2013, 12:33 pm

The Education of Henry Adams: A Review

DSC09878

Henry and his book in fall, 2013 (Photo credit: Rachel Adams)

Rachel Adams, Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability and Discovery (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013). 272 pp. $17.95.

Raising Henry begins with two images. The first is the photograph of author Rachel Adams and her son Henry on the front of the book. It is, Adams tells us, one of the few photographs of them together, since she is usually the one behind the camera. The second image is one she only describes in the opening paragraphs of the book: a cherished photograph of her mother, already dying of cancer in Rachel’s childhood.

These images combine to ask the reader: what does it mean, not only to focus on the disabled subject, but to expand our view and allow a disabled child’s mother, father or siblings to be “in the picture”…

Read More

September 17, 2013, 8:34 am

Who Pays for Free? When Universities Give Our Work Away

shorter

David Delgado Shorter

In today’s Wired Campus, Hannah Winston reports that the chancellor’s office of California’s community college system will make materials that they have funded available for free under a Creative Commons License. But as today’s guest blogger, David Delgado Shorter, a film maker and professor of anthropology at the University of California at Los Angeles asks, aren’t faculty ultimately paying for these generous policies?

I received a nice note the other day from one of my University’s librarians alerting me to the good news that they had purchased a licensing agreement with a company that would give any UCLA student free access to my book as an e-edition. This news, she informed me, would mean that more colleagues on campus could assign my book more affordably. Well, not just affordable…

Read More

September 8, 2013, 11:18 am

Your Weekly Radical Reader: Shorts From Around The Web

-Rafael-Nadal-of-Spain-pulls-his-shorts-rafael-nadal-31103796-1024-1537

My current favorite shorts are being worn by Rafa out in Queens.

There’s a lot sitting on our desk at Tenured Radical, each item of which deserves its own post.  But since we will be away much of the week doing research at Cornell and hanging with the History Department (Thursday, September 12, Guerlac Room in the Andrew White House, at 4:30), there may not be much attention to bloggy biz. So, without further ado, our news shorts include:

The University Without Students!  If you read this week’s New Yorker puff piece on John Sexton, the president of New York University, you will realize that the future is now. The role of universities is to provide real estate for executives and law school faculty, conduct high-level negotiations with dictatorships, and move as many students abroad as possible where they can …

Read More

June 11, 2013, 10:22 am

A Dinner Party with Pussy Riot and Judy Chicago

931371_10151495735323732_753159410_nTwo members of the Moscow-based feminist punk rock collective Pussy Riot have been spotted in New York City in the last week.  One of their destinations was the Landmark Sunshine Theater on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, where they took in the premiere of the HBO documentary, “Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer.” Since members of the collective wear neon balaclavas when they perform publicly, the celebrity crowd — which included Patti Smith — did not initially know that they were there.  According to The New York Times, the pair also hit “the feminist bookstore Bluestockings on the Lower East Side,” met ”with leaders of Occupy Wall Street and receiving a guided tour of  “The Dinner Party,” Judy Chicago’s feminist installation at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.” (more…)

June 2, 2013, 2:55 pm

Gossip Girl: Hedda Hopper’s Conservative Empire

Jennifer Frost, Hedda Hopper’s Hollywood: Celebrity Gossip and American Conservatism. New York University Press, 2011. 281 pp. Index. B & W illustrations. Hardcover $31.50; Kindle $15.12.

1101470728_400

Hedda Hopper makes the cover of Time in 1947.

Every once in a while you read a book that is pure joy, and Jennifer Frost’s Hedda Hopper’s Hollywood hits all the right notes. It’s got movie stars, it’s got intrigue, and it’s got humor, it’s got a light but effective theoretical frame. Best of all, it’s organized around a driven, ambitious woman who — if she hadn’t played herself in any number of films — could have been played by Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, or Barbara Stanwyck. If they had dared.

Born Elda Furry in 1885, the butcher’s daughter who became Hedda Hopper fled industrial Altoona, Pennsylvania, with a suitcase…

Read More

April 24, 2013, 9:26 pm

Report From The Post-Feminist Mystique

514_400x400_NoPeelIf you are not a subscriber to The Nation you may have missed author Deborah Copaken Kogan’s “My So-Called Post-Feminist Lit Life.” Riffing off the title of the  TV series about adolescent female angst that introduced us to Claire Danes back in 1994, Kogan rips the lid off what it means to be a female author in a literary world where men rule.

Kogan’s reflection follows her nomination for the Orange Prize, a British literary award given only to women, and is a reflection on the perennial (male) complaint that the time for “women’s” anything has passed. Because feminism finished the work — and anyway, if it’s for women it’s got to be second rate, right? Unlike things for men, like, say, Augusta National, the Joint Chiefs of Staff or President of the United States.

Revealing that she has not yet been allowed to pick a title for one of her four books (Shuttergirl, a 2002 memoir of…

Read More

March 22, 2013, 12:50 pm

While The Mice Play: What We Are Reading on Vacation

book-sunglasses-beach_h528Even Radicals must rest someday, although like all academics, for this household going on vacation generally means finding another, nicer, place to sit down and read.  Hence, we have removed ourselves to the island where Christopher Columbus, that murderous wretch, first set foot in the Americas in 1492. So what are we reading here in the land formerly occupied by the Taíno people

Well of course, we are obviously still online:

  • Mandy Berry, who has raised Facebook to an art form, comes out about the Grumpy Cat March Madness Tournament, organized and orchestrated by Mandy Berry herself. I managed to get in by insinuating myself shamelessly, bumping aside an actual friend of Berry’s in the process, following a Facebook announcement that there was only one spot left in the Grumpy Cat Bracket. But hello? I picked Harvard over Arizona Mandy Berry. Why I picked Harvard do not…

Read More

December 12, 2012, 9:56 pm

A Whale of an Idea: Moby Dicke Booke Clubbe

Comrade Physioproffe is starting a Moby Dicke Booke Clubbe. Celebrate the holidays by checking in here to discuss greatte literature with Physioproffe, Historiann, Fratguy, brianogilvie, Matt_L and all your favorite academic blogge stars.

November 12, 2012, 1:37 pm

Publishing Rocks, Doesn’t It?

If Marx were alive, I know he would publish in Renee Romano & my series at the University of Georgia Press

In honor of University Press Week, your very own Tenured Radical represents the University of Georgia Press with “Small is Better: Why University Presses Are Sustainable Presses.”

For the complete schedule of the University Press Blog Tour, go here.

Enjoy.