Previous
Next

Military History Digest #133

October 23, 2010, 12:36 pm

Table of Contents

1. John T. Weikert Farm (Francis Althoff Farm) by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
2. Schmidt: “Civil War Justice in Southeast Missouri” by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
3. The R Word by Brett Holman at Airminded
4. America’s Naval Technological Surprise in the War of 1812 by USS Constitution at Naval History Blog
5. Another Enlistee in the Fight for Equal Rights by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
6. Seven Years Bad Luck? Making Periscopes on Gallipoli by Dianne Rutherford at Australian War Memorial
7. Wars of Alexander the Great: Alexander at Tyre by n/a at About.com Military History
8. Origin of Abraham Lincoln as American Icon by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
9. Minor P. and Samuel Jackson Spaulding by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
10. WWII Special Ops Training Tip – Defending the Strangle-Hold by Steven Terjeson at World War II History
11. “All Hands Abandon Ship!” by Charles McCain at World War II History
12. The Birth of the Continental Navy by NHHC at Naval History Blog
13. World War I: Battle of Loos Ends by n/a at About.com Military History
14. Captain White by Amanda Rebbeck at Australian War Memorial
15. VADs and the Great War by light.sue@gmail.com (Sue Light) at This Intrepid Band
16. Breaking the Mold: the Ben Cloud Story by NHHC at Naval History Blog
17. James H. Sparks by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
18. Pow Interview: Rudy Froeschle by Bill Reynolds at World War II History
19. The Brass Argues: Who Gets to Nuke the North? by Phil Ewing at Other Military History Stuff
20. Project Cadillac: the Beginning of AEW in the Us Navy (Part II) by SteelJaw at Other Military History Stuff
21. Book Review: the Iraq Wars and America’s Military Revolution by Paul McLeary at Other Military History Stuff
22. Killing the Bismarck by noreply@blogger.com (Robert Farley) at Other Military History Stuff
23. Cool Ship Plaque: USS Alameda County (Avb-1) | Naval History Blog by n/a at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. John T. Weikert Farm (Francis Althoff Farm) by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Farm Name: Weikert Farm. (Sometimes called the Francis
Althoff Farm.) War Time Owner: John T. Weikert. Location: Off
the Wheatfield Road in the Valley of Death Extant Buildings:
House (1877-1880) and barn (1877-1890) both post-date the
battle. About the Farm: The barn marks the environs of the
Weikert Farm which figured prominently in struggle for Little
Round Top/Devil’s Den area. Although the barn post-dates 1863
Battle, still falls within period of significance for park.
It contributes to the integrity of the agricultural
battlefield landscape by maintaining the historic spatial
organization and cluster arrangement of the…

2. Schmidt: “Civil War Justice in Southeast Missouri” by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

3. The R Word by Brett Holman at Airminded

The word ‘reprisals’ popped up during my 1940 post-blogging
quite frequently. After one post I had the idea of checking
whether it could be used as an index of British attitudes
towards the bombing of Germany throughout the rest of the
war. The short answer is: not really. But it was still worth
trying. With The Times and the Manchester Guardian/Observer
databases I can luckily do this in a semi-automated fashion.
Automated because I can do keyword searches on the full text
of the newspapers, semi because the interfaces are crude and
require manually stepping through the…

4. America’s Naval Technological Surprise in the War of 1812 by USS Constitution at Naval History Blog

The original six frigates of the US Navy were ahead of their
time in design. Though ships have changed dramatically, we
still hearken to the days of USS CONSTITUTION and her five
sister ships before we were a major naval power. It wasn’t
possible for our fledgling nation to build a fleet which
could [...]…

5. Another Enlistee in the Fight for Equal Rights by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

In a recent post I shared the story of Maj. Gen. Benjamin
Butler’s conversion to a staunch supporter of equal rights as
he rode across a battlefield strewn with dead soldiers of
color during the Civil War.Here’s another story of
transformation, told by C.C. Willetts, who served in several
staff positions during the war, including a paymaster and
volunteer aide to Col. Charles W. Blair of the Fourteenth
Kansas Cavalry. Willetts spoke these words on January 1,
1863, at a celebration held by the First Kansas Colored
Infantry to celebrate the Emancipation Proclamation and honor
President Abraham Lincoln:If I ever…

6. Seven Years Bad Luck? Making Periscopes on Gallipoli by Dianne Rutherford at Australian War Memorial

When the Gallipoli campaign quickly bogged down into trench
warfare, there were not enough periscopes available to allow
Australian and New Zealand soldiers to look over the parapets
at ANZAC without being shot. Australian soldier using an
improvised periscope at Gallipoli C01471 Luckily the soldiers
do not appear to have been superstitious as to fill the gap
improvised periscopes [...]

7. Wars of Alexander the Great: Alexander at Tyre by n/a at About.com Military History

Advancing south along the Mediterranean after his victories
at Granicus and Issus, Alexander the Great laid siege to the
island city of Tyre. Unable to strike directly at Tyre and
lacking a strong navy, he began construction of a causeway
extending across the water to the city’s walls. As it
progressed, construction was protected by two massive siege
towers. Attacking with a fire ship, the Tyrians succeeded in
burning both to the ground. Reinforced by a large number of
ships, Alexander pressed on with the mole and began a series
of naval attacks. Finally breaching the city’s walls, he
launched…

8. Origin of Abraham Lincoln as American Icon by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

There are those who trace Abraham Lincoln’s status as
American icon to his assassination in April 1865. My research
suggests January 1, 1863, the effective date of the
Emancipation Proclamation, as more accurate, at least from
the perspective of four million enslaved people. Time and
time again I’ve found references to celebrations, including a
bountiful barbecue held by the First Kansas Colored Infantry
at Fort Scott, Kansas, on the day the proclamation took
effect. Five hundred men of the regiment, their officers, and
others gathered for a feast. A series of speakers talked
about various aspects of the war, slavery…

9. Minor P. and Samuel Jackson Spaulding by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Minor P. Spaulding was born on January 5, 1843, in Paris,
Kent County, Michigan, the son of Orleans (1804-1889) and
Aurella “Rilla” Ann Patterson. (1817-1879)New York native
Orleans married Sally Van Dyke in 1823, presumably in New
York and by 1830 they were living in Buffalo, Niagara County
where Minor’s older half-brother Samuel was born. Orleans
took his family and left New York sometime between 1830 and
1832 by which time they had settled in Michigan; according to
one local history Orleans and Philanzo Bowen settled in Kent
County by 1836 and in Paris Township the…

10. Wwii Special Ops Training Tip – Defending the Strangle-Hold by Steven Terjeson at World War II History

reposted from ZenithPresstheBlog] Compiled from authentic
documents originally issued by the British SOE and American
OSS, Special Ops 1939-1945: A Manual of Cover Warfare and
Training provides insight into the training and techniques of
Allied agents operating behind enemy lines during World War
II. Today’s lesson: defending the strangle-hold.

You are seized by the throat as in Fig. 23.
1. Seize your opponent’s right elbow with your left hand from
underneath, your thumb to the right.
2. Reach over his arms and seize his right wrist with your
right hand (Fig. 24).
3. Apply pressure on his left…

11. “All Hands Abandon Ship!” by Charles McCain at World War II History

Crossposted from CharlesMcCain.com] The most tragic moments
in the lives of both merchant sailors and navy sailors in
World War Two are the stories of the men who survived the
sinking of their ships, then ended up in lifeboats or on
rafts and drifted for weeks before being rescued or, in many
cases, never rescued at all. Yet even before the men tried to
survive in a lifeboat, crewmen first had to launch the
lifeboat which was very difficult to do and if the ship went
down fast, was never attempted. In that time, launching a
lifeboat from a ship…

12. The Birth of the Continental Navy by NHHC at Naval History Blog

For those Americans who lived on the continent’s coastal
waterways in the fall of 1775, the question of naval defense
was of no small moment. Hostilities with Great Britain were
well into their sixth month and the prospect of a peaceful
political settlement with the mother country appeared to be
fading rapidly. Seizures of American [...]…

13. World War I: Battle of Loos Ends by n/a at About.com Military History

September 25-October 14, 1915 – After several weeks of bloody
fighting, the Battle of Loos comes to an end. Attacking as
part of the larger Third Battle of Artois, British forces
opened the Battle of Loos on September 25. Directed by Gen.
Sir Douglas Haig, the British First Army had some initial
success despite meeting heavy German resistance. Penetrating
into the three-mile deep German defensive zone, the British
were effectively halted on September 26 when two reserve
divisions were cut down en masse when attacking without
artillery protection. Fighting continued and a massive German
counteroffensive was turned back on…

14. Captain White by Amanda Rebbeck at Australian War Memorial

This is the story of Thomas Walter White, Australian Flying
Corps and his daring escape from a Turkish Prisoner of War
camp. In preparation for the upcoming 100 year anniversaries
of the First World War, curatorial sections at the Memorial
have begun a concentrated cataloguing effort of objects
relating to the Great War. Having taken a [...]

15. Vads and the Great War by light.sue@gmail.com (Sue Light) at This Intrepid Band

For a long time I’ve been meaning to write something for the
website about VADs. I get quite a lot of emails asking for
information on tracking them down -rather more than for
trained nurses – probably because there were just so many of
them, and I know the interest is out there. So eventually
I’ve got round to writing a brief overview of their wartime
work with some background information of the service, and a
few pictures. And having started I’ll try to add some more
bits and pieces in the future. The article is here:VADs and
the Great War…

16. Breaking the Mold: the Ben Cloud Story by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Flying over Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War in an RF-8
Crusader, Ben Cloud never pondered his status as an officer
of African American and Native American descent. His main
concern was getting good photos of the Ho Chi Minh trail, and
surviving the antiaircraft fire he received on every mission.
Cloud came from a [...]…

17. James H. Sparks by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

James H. Sparks was born in 1844 in Ionia County, Michigan,
the son of Stephen Jr. (b. 1813) and Angeline (b. 1821).New
York natives James’ parents were married in 1841 in Ionia
County and by 1850 James was attending school and living with
his family on a farm in Keene, Ionia County; next door lived
his grandparents Stephen Sr.(b. 1781 in Connecticut) and
Mercy (b. 1784 in Massachusetts). James probably lived his
entire prewar life in Ionia County. James was still living in
Keene in 1860.James stood 5’10” with black eyes, dark hair
and a dark complexion…

18. Pow Interview: Rudy Froeschle by Bill Reynolds at World War II History

Interview with Rudy Froeschle (Thursday, October 7, 2010 – 9
am est) Rudy Froeschle (Ft. Myers, Fla.) was a Bomber pilot
who joined the 384th Bomb Group, 544th Fighter Squadron in
1943. During his 2nd mission in Stuttgart, Germany his plane
was gunned down and he was held captive for over two years.
While in captivity, he taught German grammar and literature
to college students. A snapshot of Rudy was profiled in a
recent documentary on the History Channel called “Great
Escapes of World War II”. The documentary highlighted POW’s
battles’ with severe depression while in captivity. Rudy is
shown with…

19. The Brass Argues: Who Gets to Nuke the North? by Phil Ewing at Other Military History Stuff

A nuclear-armed A-4 Skyhawk, like this one getting ready to
take off from the carrier Hancock, was just one item on the
menu of strike options available if the U.S. wanted to strike
North Korea — if the Air Force didn’t get there first. //
NavHistHerCom This morning’s AP report about the U.S.
military’s newly declassified nuclear weapons plans for North
Korea is an absolute must read. Did you know the infamous
Gen. Douglas MacArthur had a plan to hit the North with 30 to
50 nuclear weapons? That the U.S. has seriously considered
nuking the North at least six…

20. Project Cadillac: the Beginning of Aew in the Us Navy (Part Ii) by SteelJaw at Other Military History Stuff

Project Cadillac (Part II) Part I

Project Cadillac was more than just a program to develop
radar – it would develop an entire AEW system — Radar, IFF,
relay equipment, shipboard receivers, and airborne platform.
Such an undertaking would be ambitious enough in peacetime,
at the height of a critical stage in the war it bordered on a
divine miracle. – SJS February 1944. In Europe the invasion
of Italy is well underway and the Battle of Monte Casino is
engaged. Eisenhower establishes SHAFE headquarters in
Britain. The RAF drops 2300 tons on Berlin, the 8th AF begins
the “Big Week” bombing campaign…

21. Book Review: the Iraq Wars and America’s Military Revolution by Paul McLeary at Other Military History Stuff

What constitutes a true military revolution? If you think you
already have a pretty good idea, a look through Keith
Shimko’s excellent new book The Iraq Wars and America’s
Military Revolution may change your mind. The idea of a
“revolution in military affairs” (RMA) has taken quite a
beating recently given the very public flameout of the
Rumsfeld-era Future Combat Systems suite of technologies
which was billed as a revolutionary offering of sensor and
communication technologies that would give the American
soldier an almost impossibly perfect situational awareness of
the battlefield. That laudable goal collided head-on with the…

22. Killing the Bismarck by noreply@blogger.com (Robert Farley) at Other Military History Stuff

Iain Ballantyne makes a controversial claim in his new book,
Killing the Bismarck. I haven’t read the book yet, but
there’s a summary of the main argument in the latest
Warships: IFR. Ballantyne argues that there is meaningful
evidence that Bismarck was trying to surrender to the Royal
Navy task force on May 27, 1941, and that Royal Navy officers
had enough information to determine German intent. Ballantyne
bases his argument on the eyewitness reports of several
officers and men aboard Rodney and King George V who claim to
have seen the crew of Bismarck raise a black flag (indicating…

23. Cool Ship Plaque: Uss Alameda County (Avb-1) | Naval History Blog by n/a at Other Military History Stuff

This entry was posted in military history. Bookmark the permalink.