Tag Archives: Architecture

June 23, 2014, 9:41 am

Guest post: Blending and flipping modern architecture

There’s a lot on this blog about the flipped or inverted classroom, and it’s primarily from the mathematics and STEM perspective. I am often asked how the inverted classroom might look in the humanities or social sciences. I’d like to welcome Jeff Schramm, an associate professor of History and Political Science at Missouri University of Science and Technology, whose guest post today details his use of the flipped classroom in a history of architecture course. Enjoy! –rt

IMG_4765How many of you reading this have a formal dining room in your home? A separate room, not just a dining area in a kitchen or great room. How often does this dining room get used for its intended purpose? Daily? Weekly? A couple times a year on major holidays?

This is how I begin my Architecture, Technology and Society, 1750-present class. It’s my first attempt at helping my students to think about the built…

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April 17, 2009, 4:45 am

How calculus is changing architecture

All snarks about $24M mansions being funded by calculus textbook sales aside, there is an emerging relationship between calculus and architecture that is really fascinating. Since WordPress.com now allows direct embedding of TED talks, I thought I’d share this talk from architect Greg Lynn on this subject. I ran across this a couple of weeks ago and I’ve been wondering about it ever since. The point about using calculus to change architecture from a “discrete” notion into a “continuous” notion is particularly interesting.

[ted id=http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/430]

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