March 4, 2014, 2:59 pm

The inverted calculus course: Using Guided Practice to build self-regulation

7369580478_92ccf6bfbd_mThis post continues the series of posts about the inverted/flipped calculus class that I taught in the Fall. In the previous post, I described the theoretical framework for the design of this course: self-regulated learning, as formulated by Paul Pintrich. In this post, I want to get into some of the design detail of how we (myself, and my colleague Marcia Frobish who also taught a flipped section of calculus) tried to build self-regulated learning into the course structure itself.

We said last time that self-regulated learning is marked by four distinct kinds of behavior:

  1. Self-regulating learners are an active participants in the learning process.
  2. Self-regulating learners can, and do, monitor and control aspects of their cognition, motivation, and learning behaviors.
  3. Self-regulating learners have criteria against which they can judge whether their current learning status is…

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March 3, 2014, 9:00 am

The inverted calculus course and self-regulated learning

895220635_71c0ea6ee4_mA few weeks ago I began a series to review the Calculus course that Marcia Frobish and I taught using the inverted/flipped class design, back in the Fall. I want to pick up the thread here about the unifying principle behind the course, which is the concept of self-regulated learning.

Self-regulated learning is what it sounds like: Learning that is initiated, managed, and assessed by the learners themselves. An instructor can play a role in this process, so it’s not the same thing as teaching yourself a subject (although all successful autodidacts are self-regulating learners), but it refers to how the individual learner approaches learning tasks.

For example, take someone learning about optimization problems in calculus. Four things describe how a self-regulating learner approaches this topic.

  1. The learner works actively on optimization problems as the primary form of…

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February 28, 2014, 11:15 am

Weekend reading (February 28)

This week’s small shiny objects from around the interwebs:

John Cook has an interesting short article on the log semiring. Suitable for nontrivial examples in your next ring theory class.

Here’s a terrific short video that explains the Diffie-Hellman key exchange in terms of color mixing.

Here’s a longer video of John Baez talking about network theory, which we first mentioned a few weeks ago.

And here’s a video by Stephen Wolfram giving an introduction to the Wolfram Language. I’m curious to try this out.

Just in time for the NFL Draft season (OK, it’s still six weeks away, but whatever) here’s an interesting article on how the Dallas Cowboys used statistics and computers to revolutionize their approach to tracking and choosing players. Consider it an early prototype of Big Data.

Are today’s tablet and phone apps turning us into sociopaths? It might be …

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February 14, 2014, 2:00 pm

Weekend reading (February 14)

Look! A small shiny object.

Look! A small shiny object.

From the week that was, here is your random list of shiny objects from around the web.

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February 11, 2014, 2:46 pm

4+1 Interview: Eric Mazur

speaker-eric-mazurI am very excited to present this next installment in the 4+1 Interview series, this time featuring Prof. Eric Mazur of Harvard University. Prof. Mazur has been an innovator and driving force for positive change in STEM education for over 25 years, most notably as the inventor of peer instruction, which I’ve written about extensively here on the blog. His talk “Confessions of a Converted Lecturer” singlehandedly and radically changed my ideas about teaching when I first saw it six years ago. So it was great to sit down with Eric on Skype last week and talk about some questions I had for him about teaching and technology.

You can stream the audio from the interview below. Don’t miss:

  • A quick side trip to see if peer instruction is used in K-6 classrooms.
  • Thoughts about how Eric’s background as a kid in Montessori schools affected his thoughts about teaching later.
  • What’s going…

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February 7, 2014, 2:00 pm

Weekend reading (February 7)

Sorry that this week has been a little off on the posting frequency side. It’ll pick back up soon. In the meanwhile, here are some shiny items from around the web:

Math:

  • Neat article from John Baez on the use of category theory in control theory. I like how he describes category theory as a way of formally studying anything that can be diagrammatically expressed.
  • Mathematicians have found that the Rubik’s cube has a Hamiltonian circuit – a sequence of quarter-turn moves that will generate all the 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 positions that a Rubik’s cube can attain, and then on the next move restore it to its original state.

Technology:

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January 31, 2014, 2:00 pm

Weekend reading (January 31)

Some shiny things from around the web for your weekend reading:

Math

Technology

  • I’m enrolled in Cathy Davidson’s higher education MOOC right now and she mentioned lynda.com in one of the lectures. It’s a massive repository of instructional videos on all kinds of technical subjects from programming languages to how to arrange the lighting for your video shoot. Costs money to subscribe but you can get some videos free.
  • Evernote (one of my can’t-live-without apps) has made some nice updates to the iOS version. Android next please?

Education

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January 29, 2014, 5:17 pm

An end to unsolicited review copies of textbooks, please

2014-01-29 16.29.42The picture you see here is my afternoon mail today. It consists of two copies of a new Calculus text (hardcover), two copies of another Calculus text (hardcover), and one copy of an intermediate algebra text (softcover).

I did not request a single one of these. I certainly did not request duplicates of two of them. The last time I taught intermediate algebra was the mid-1990′s. I am not on a committee that selects textbooks. I have no use for these books other than to prop open a door. So why did I get them? I have no idea.

When I think about the waste and expense of these unsolicited review copies of textbooks, it makes me downright angry. I went to UPS.com and used a back-of-the-envelope estimate of weight and shipping distance, and got that the total package of these books would have cost about $20 to ship to me from its point of origin. That’s not a large sum, but how many…

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January 27, 2014, 7:55 am

The inverted calculus course: Overture

3011652637_05f202dca6_n As many Casting Out Nines readers know, last semester I undertook to rethink the freshman calculus 1 course here at my institution by converting it to an inverted or “flipped” class model. It’s been two months since the end of that semester, and this blog post is the first in a (lengthy)  series that I’ll be rolling out in the coming weeks that lays out how the course was designed, what happened, and how it all turned out.

Let me begin this series with a story about why I even bother with the flipped classroom.

The student in my programming class looked me straight in the eye and said, “I need you to lecture to me.” She said, “I can’t do the work unless someone tells me how to get started and then shows me how, step by step.” I took a moment to listen and think. “Do you mean that you find the work hard and it’s easier if someone tells you how to start and…

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January 24, 2014, 8:03 am

Weekend reading

Here are some items from around the web for your weekend enjoyment.

Math

  • Here’s a great post on Medium by Nik Custodio in which he explains Bitcoin like I’m five. I think the audience level here is rather older than five, but it’s still probably the best explanation of the problems that Bitcoin attempts to solve, and how it solves them, that I’ve seen. (I wasn’t sure whether to file this under “Math” or “Technology” because it’s a lot of both.)

Education

  • If you’ve ever been interested in standards-based grading, you won’t want to miss Kate Owens’ post An Adventure in Standards-Based Calculus where she lays out why, and bits about “how”, she intends to use SBG in her Calculus 2 course this semester. Don’t miss the link to George McNulty’s calc 2 syllabus at the end, which is a great example of how to use SBG in actual practice.
  • Good report…

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