Indifference Toward Disabled Scholars, Especially at Conferences, Troubles a Disabilities Scholar

Indifference Toward the Disabled at Academic Conferences Dismays a Disabilities Scholar 1

Syracuse U.

William J. Peace, a bioethicist and disability-studies scholar who has been a paraplegic since he was a teen: “I spend a lot of time—hours and hours—advocating for myself.”

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close Indifference Toward the Disabled at Academic Conferences Dismays a Disabilities Scholar 1

Syracuse U.

William J. Peace, a bioethicist and disability-studies scholar who has been a paraplegic since he was a teen: “I spend a lot of time—hours and hours—advocating for myself.”

A key part of academic life is attending scholarly conferences, where colleagues gather to share knowledge and make the connections that could lead to their next joint research project, paper, or book.

But for people with disabilities, like William J. Peace, attending such meetings is almost always frustrating, if not impossible at times. Although the Americans With Disabilities Act is nearly 25 years old, Mr. Peace's experience at academic conferences shows that the change it was