Ending a Well-Paid Presidency Often Comes at High Cost

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Ty Wright for The Chronicle, Redux; Aaron M. Sprecher, AP Images; Dale Wetzel , AP Images

From left: E. Gordon Gee, Ohio State U.; R. Bowen Loftin, Texas A&M U. at College Station; Hamid A. Shirvani, North Dakota U. system

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Ty Wright for The Chronicle, Redux; Aaron M. Sprecher, AP Images; Dale Wetzel , AP Images

From left: E. Gordon Gee, Ohio State U.; R. Bowen Loftin, Texas A&M U. at College Station; Hamid A. Shirvani, North Dakota U. system

The three highest-paid public-college leaders in the 
nation have something in common: They earned hundreds of thousands of dollars on their way out the door.

The size of the parting packages given to these men—two who resigned amid long-churning controversies and one 
who quit unexpectedly—demonstrates just how expensive it can be for a college to end the presidency of a well-paid chief.

E. Gordon Gee, the popular and gaffe-prone