Lost in Translation: N.J. Lawmakers and Higher Ed Try to Understand Each Other

Lost in Translation: N.J. Lawmakers and Higher Ed 
Try to Understand Each Other 1

Bill Wittkop for New Jersey City U.

Sue Henderson, president of New Jersey City U., says she’s “willing to have a discussion about a tuition freeze.” 
But such a freeze, without any additional state appropriations, would force colleges to make significant 
changes in their business model, she says.

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close Lost in Translation: N.J. Lawmakers and Higher Ed 
Try to Understand Each Other 1

Bill Wittkop for New Jersey City U.

Sue Henderson, president of New Jersey City U., says she’s “willing to have a discussion about a tuition freeze.” 
But such a freeze, without any additional state appropriations, would force colleges to make significant 
changes in their business model, she says.

State lawmakers and college officials often seem to talk past one another and speak different languages when they debate higher-education policy.

A good example of the pattern is in New Jersey, where Assemblywoman Celeste M. Riley, a Democrat who leads her chamber’s higher-education committee, has introduced a wide-ranging package of 20 bills aimed at cutting the costs of attending college and making public, private, and for-profit institutions more accountable for student