White Teacher, Black Power

White Teacher, Black Power 1

Barton Silverman, Getty Images

In May 1970, crowds marched in New Haven, Conn., to show their support for members of the Black Panther Party who had been prosecuted on charges related to the death of an alleged FBI informant.

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Barton Silverman, Getty Images

In May 1970, crowds marched in New Haven, Conn., to show their support for members of the Black Panther Party who had been prosecuted on charges related to the death of an alleged FBI informant.

Martin Lu­ther King Jr. Day has got­ten me think­ing a­bout what teach­ing Af­ri­can-Amer­i­can his­tory was like 40 years ago. King, recently vibrantly alive, was just becoming a fig­ure to be me­mo­ri­al­ized in death. Cou­pled with vig­or­ous pro­tests over a war abroad, events at home over the past dec­ade had tum­bled down so quick­ly—Rosa Parks, Brown v. Board of Education, Freedom