Public Colleges Brace for Expected Drop in Out-of-State Students and the Revenue They Provide

Public Colleges Brace for Expected Drop in Out-of-State Students 1

Jay Premack for the Chronicle

For each in-state student, George Mason U. has to find more than $2,000 in its budget to cover the difference between what it costs to educate the student and what tuition and state money cover, says Provost Peter N. Stearns.

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close Public Colleges Brace for Expected Drop in Out-of-State Students 1

Jay Premack for the Chronicle

For each in-state student, George Mason U. has to find more than $2,000 in its budget to cover the difference between what it costs to educate the student and what tuition and state money cover, says Provost Peter N. Stearns.

Students like Matthew Paauw may have administrators at some public colleges on edge.

The 18-year-old from North Bend, Wash., applied to seven colleges, including private ones and public campuses out of state. But Mr. Paauw has chosen to attend Washington State University, a public institution about half as expensive as any of his other choices.

"My dad has been saving for quite a few years for my college and had much of it in stocks," he says. "When the stocks turned, he lost