Teaching Clearly Can Be a Deceptively Simple Way to Improve Learning

Teaching Clearly Can Be a Deceptively Simple Way to Improve Learning 1

U. of Iowa College of Education

Ernest T. Pascarella, a professor of higher education at the U. of Iowa, helped produce the studies of teaching and learning. "It took me a while to become a decent teacher," he says. "I just hate to think of the number of students I've screwed up."

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U. of Iowa College of Education

Ernest T. Pascarella, a professor of higher education at the U. of Iowa, helped produce the studies of teaching and learning. "It took me a while to become a decent teacher," he says. "I just hate to think of the number of students I've screwed up."

Want to improve student learning? Start by teaching in a clearer and more organized way.

That is the deceptively simple implication of three studies presented last week at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education.

The studies further document an established correlation between students' perceptions of their professors' teaching and subsequent improvements in the students' learning and attitudes.

While much of the pedagogical conversation