Study Finds Rampant Bias in Animal-Based Drug Research

Study Finds Rampant Bias in Animal-Based Drug Research 1

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Scientists commonly use laboratory animals to test potential new treatments for human diseases. But most drugs found to be effective in, say, lab mice ultimately fail in human beings.

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Scientists commonly use laboratory animals to test potential new treatments for human diseases. But most drugs found to be effective in, say, lab mice ultimately fail in human beings.

It's been an open secret in medicine for some time: A central part of the drug-discovery pipeline is broken.

For decades, scientists have relied on animal models of human disease to test potential new treatments. Yet it has become increasingly clear that most drugs found to be effective in, say, lab mice ultimately fail in human beings. Pharmaceutical companies have raised alarms. By one recent estimate, only 11 percent of drugs that enter human trials are ever approved for use.