In Search for Elusive Boson, U.S. Experience vs. European Technology

UIn Search for Elusive Boson, U.S. Experience vs. European Technology 1

Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

Young-Kee Kim, deputy director of Fermilab, says that even if CERN's collider finds the Higgs boson, Fermilab "could still deliver important information about it."

Enlarge Image
close UIn Search for Elusive Boson, U.S. Experience vs. European Technology 1

Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

Young-Kee Kim, deputy director of Fermilab, says that even if CERN's collider finds the Higgs boson, Fermilab "could still deliver important information about it."

In the search for what could be the universe's lone undiscovered fundamental particle, the big new atom-smasher in Switzerland is widely regarded as the only game in town.

The Large Hadron Collider, built by the European group CERN, is several times as powerful as the next-biggest accelerator, the Tevatron, near Chicago. So far the Tevatron has not been able to detect the elusive particle, the so-called Higgs boson.

Still, with the Tevatron nearing the end of its scheduled