Fear. It's What's for Dinner.

Fear. It's What's for Dinner. 1

U. of Chicago Press

Harvey Levenstein's new book traces America's food fears to Louis Pasteur's 19th-century linkage of disease to bacteria, coupled with industrialization. A World War II-era poster issues a warning.

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U. of Chicago Press

Harvey Levenstein's new book traces America's food fears to Louis Pasteur's 19th-century linkage of disease to bacteria, coupled with industrialization. A World War II-era poster issues a warning.

In the late 1970s, Harvey Levenstein was a Canadian labor historian with a visiting professorship at the University of Warwick in England. Inspired by the British New Leftist E.P. Thompson's The Making of the English Working Class, Levenstein's colleagues were investigating blue-collar soccer mania, participation in brass bands, and the like. But the field was "overwhelmingly dominated by men," who were "completely intimidated by questions involving the kitchen."

Levenstein,