Education Dean's Fraud Teaches U. of Louisville a Hard Lesson

The former official now awaits trial. Some colleagues say the university should have caught him earlier.

Education Dean's Fraud Teaches U. of Louisville a Hard Lesson 
 The former official now awaits trial. Some colleagues say the university should have caught him earlier. 1

Sam Upshaw Jr., The Courier-Journal

Robert D. Felner (right), a former dean of education at the U. of Louisville, is escorted into a federal building in Louisville by his lawyers in October 2008. That month a federal grand jury indicted Mr. Felner on nine counts of mail fraud, money laundering, and tax evasion for his mishandling of a grant from the U.S. Education Department.

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close Education Dean's Fraud Teaches U. of Louisville a Hard Lesson 
 The former official now awaits trial. Some colleagues say the university should have caught him earlier. 1

Sam Upshaw Jr., The Courier-Journal

Robert D. Felner (right), a former dean of education at the U. of Louisville, is escorted into a federal building in Louisville by his lawyers in October 2008. That month a federal grand jury indicted Mr. Felner on nine counts of mail fraud, money laundering, and tax evasion for his mishandling of a grant from the U.S. Education Department.

At the end of 2005, Robert D. Felner was riding high. A well-paid dean at the University of Louisville, he had just secured a $694,000 earmarked grant from the U.S. Department of Education to create an elaborate research center to help Kentucky's public schools.

The grant proposal, which Mr. Felner had labored over for months, made some impressive promises. Five Louisville faculty members would devote time to the center, and four other people would be hired. The advisory board would