• November 28, 2014

Episode 73: The Case for Digital Scholarship

Edward Ayers Headshot

U. of Richmond

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U. of Richmond

Plenty of high-tech teaching materials are now available, but the use of digital tools in scholarship has been slow to take off, says Edward L. Ayers, president of the University of Richmond, who is a pioneer in the field of digital history.

Download this recording as an MP3 file, or subscribe to Tech Therapy on iTunes.

Links mentioned in this episode: BackStory With the American History Guys | The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War | The Great ProfHacker Offline Challenge

Each month, The Chronicle's Tech Therapy podcast offers analysis and advice on what the latest gadgets and buzzwords mean for professors, administrators, and students. Join hosts Jeff Young, a Chronicle reporter, and Warren Arbogast, a technology consultant who works with colleges, for a lively discussion—as well as interviews with leading thinkers in technology.

Comments

1. jsalmons - July 08, 2010 at 09:48 am

I am interested in the use of digital tools to collect data through interviews and observations conducted online. This kind of qualitative research requires human contact, made increasingly possible through rich media communications. These communications tools allow for visual exchanges including being able to see the research participant as well as to share visual representations of the research phenomenena.

My recent book from Sage Publications is Online Interviews in Real Time. This book examines research design and ethics when data is collected through interviews conducted with text-based, video call/videoconference, multi-channel meeting spaces, and 3D immersive technologies. Right now I am working on an edited collection of e-interview research cases from across disciplines, Cases in Online Interview Research. See: http://tinyurl.com/einterview

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