Michigan's New Right-to-Work Laws Are Expected to Have a Delayed Impact on Most College Unions

Michigan's New Right-to-Work Laws Will Have Delayed Impact on Many College Unions 1

Bill Pugliano, Getty Images

Union supporters rallied at the Michigan Capitol on Tuesday, but their pressure did not dissuade Gov. Rick Snyder from signing the measures into law. The laws make the payment of union dues voluntary for private-sector employees and most employees in the public sector, including employees of public colleges.

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close Michigan's New Right-to-Work Laws Will Have Delayed Impact on Many College Unions 1

Bill Pugliano, Getty Images

Union supporters rallied at the Michigan Capitol on Tuesday, but their pressure did not dissuade Gov. Rick Snyder from signing the measures into law. The laws make the payment of union dues voluntary for private-sector employees and most employees in the public sector, including employees of public colleges.

Most union locals representing college employees in Michigan will feel little immediate impact from two right-to-work laws passed there this week because the laws' provisions restricting how unions collect dues will not apply to them until their current contracts expire.

The unions' long-term prospects for escaping the measures' effects appear bleak, however, because it is unlikely the unions' political allies will have enough power to scrap the measures anytime soon. Although