As GI Bill Expands, So Do Calls for Tracking Veterans' Academic Success

As GI Bill Expands, So Do Calls for Tracking Veterans' Academic Success 1

David Scavone

Statistics show that more than 62,000 veterans using the Post-9/11 GI Bill have graduated from about 2,000 institutions, said Curtis L. Coy of the Department of Veterans Affairs. But, he said, those numbers are "practically meaningless" because they reflect only a fraction of the 6,000 institutions nationally where veterans have enrolled on the GI Bill since the program took effect, in 2009.

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close As GI Bill Expands, So Do Calls for Tracking Veterans' Academic Success 1

David Scavone

Statistics show that more than 62,000 veterans using the Post-9/11 GI Bill have graduated from about 2,000 institutions, said Curtis L. Coy of the Department of Veterans Affairs. But, he said, those numbers are "practically meaningless" because they reflect only a fraction of the 6,000 institutions nationally where veterans have enrolled on the GI Bill since the program took effect, in 2009.

Now that more than 760,000 military veterans have made use of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a key question has emerged: What's the best way to measure the program's effectiveness?

Taxpayers have shelled out billions of dollars so far to finance the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which is designed to allow veterans to go to college full time with their living expenses covered. By the end of the program's 15-year life span, that