On average, faculty salaries rose faster than inflation for the first time in five years. Still, at some institutions, associate professors have seen their salaries stagnate over the past decade relative to those in higher and lower faculty ranks. Read more.

View trends, gender breakdowns, and comparisons of faculty salaries at 1,156 institutions from the AAUP’s Faculty Salary Survey.

 

 

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Adjunct pay information for this institution is available at the Chronicle's Adjunct Project

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Ranks comparison

2013-14

Inflation-adjusted
 
Full professors

 

  percentile for   in the survey

 
Associate professors

 

  percentile for   in the survey

 
Assistant professors

 

  percentile of   in the survey

 
Instructors

 

  percentile for   in the survey

 
Unranked faculty

 

  percentile for   in the survey

 

Gender breakdown

2013-14

Inflation-adjusted
 
Men

 

 
Women

 

 % of male counterparts.

 
 
 
  • Full professors
  • Associate professors
  • Assistant professors
  • Instructors
  • Unranked faculty

Compared to similar institutions

2013-14

Inflation-adjusted
 
Full professors

$202,000(+1.1%)

  percentile for   in the survey

 
Associate professors

$202,000(+1.1%)

  percentile for   in the survey

 
Assistant professors

$202,000(+1.1%)

  percentile for   in the survey

 
Instructors

$202,000(+1.1%)

  percentile for   in the survey

 
 
 
  • Full professors
  • Associate professors
  • Assistant professors
  • Instructors
  • Unranked faculty

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  • Unranked faculty
Loading indicator Loading... Showing 120 of   colleges
InstitutionCategory | State Full professors avg. salary Avg. raise for continuing full professors Count of full professors Avg. total compensation for full professors Salary equality for full professorsWhat women make compared to men Associate professors avg. salary Avg. raise for continuing associate professors Count of associate professors Avg. total compensation for associate professors Salary equality for associate professorsWhat women make compared to men Assistant professors avg. salary Avg. raise for continuing assistant professors Count of assistant professors Avg. total compensation for assistant professors Salary equality for assistant professorsWhat women make compared to men Instructors avg. salary Avg. raise for continuing instructors Count of instructors Avg. total compensation for instructors Salary equality for instructorsWhat women make compared to men Unranked faculty avg. salary Avg. raise for continuing unranked faculty Count of unranked faculty Avg. total compensation for unranked faculty Salary equality for unranked facultyWhat women make compared to men
 

About AAUP

Each spring, the AAUP publishes its report on faculty compensation and the economics of higher education. AAUP members receive a print copy of the report (with complete data listings) as part of their membership. Data from the survey are also available for purchase in several formats, including institutional peer comparison reports, complete datasets, and pre-publication report tables. See here for more information about ordering data from the AAUP, or contact aaupfcs@aaup.org.

About the data

Salary data are collected annually by the American Association of University Professors. Participation in the AAUP survey is optional; 1,157 institutions submitted data for the 2013-14 academic year.* Salaries are rounded to the nearest hundred dollars. Where faculty contracts are 11 or 12 months long, salaries are adjusted for a nine-month work year.

The figures reflect the average earnings of full-time instructional and research staff members whose main role (more than 50 percent) is instruction, regardless of their official faculty status. Salary averages do not include medical-school faculty, part-time faculty (even with tenure or on the tenure track), faculty at military institutions who are members of the military, employees with faculty status whose primary role is administrative, or graduate teaching assistants. At some institutions, figures include faculty members in schools of law, dentistry, nursing, business, and engineering.

Average compensation is based on total salary plus benefits. Benefits represent the institution’s contribution on behalf of the individual faculty member; the amount does not include faculty contributions. Benefits include retirement contributions, medical insurance, disability income protection, tuition for faculty dependents, Social Security, unemployment insurance, group life insurance, workers’-compensation insurance, and other benefits with cash value.

The AAUP classifies institutions as doctoral, master’s, baccalaureate, associate (with ranks) and associate (without ranks). These classifications are based on the number of degree recipients and degree-granting programs at each institution. In The Chronicle’s interactive feature, associate institutions are labeled as “two year” and those with and without academic ranks are grouped separately.

In year-over-year tables, inflation adjustments are based on the average annual Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) for the calendar year that ends during the academic year listed.

Similar institutions are listed on the basis of an algorithm that compares every institution with every other institution according to a variety of factors and selects those that are closest. The factors are control (i.e., public or private), level (i.e., two-year or four-year), historically black college or university status, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classification, religious affiliation, endowment size, total expenditures, percentage of total expenses spent on instruction, median SAT score of incoming students, admission rate, total enrollment, graduate-student enrollment, percentage of undergraduates over 25 years old, percentage of students receiving Pell Grants, percentage of students graduating with STEM degrees, region, and type of locale. To achieve better similarity lists, some factors, such as median SAT score, percentage of graduate students, and admission rate, are weighted more heavily than others, such as type of locale and instruction’s portion of expenses.

* Rutgers University at New Brunswick initially submitted incorrect data to AAUP and did not correct it in time for AAUP’s publication deadline. To avoid printing erroneous information, The Chronicle has chosen not to report any data for Rutgers at New Brunswick.